FringeArts Blog

Solo Dance for People Who Don’t Like Solo Dance: Metal & Kind’s Indestructible Flowers

Posted August 29th, 2018

This Fringe, two instructors at Philly’s dance studio Urban Movement Arts (UMA) combine their talents in a collage of new solo work designed for folks secretly underwhelmed by new solo work. Coming from diverse dance backgrounds, Lily Kind and Mark “Metal” Wong showcase multidisciplinary work grounded in social and folk dance and “a kind of analytic optimism”.

Lily Kind. Photo by Katrina D’Autrement

Metal & Kind talked to FringeArts about Indestructible Flowers, the pitfalls of solo dance, and the role of UMA in Philadelphia’s dance and hip-hop scenes.

FringeArts: What common pitfalls do you see in solo dance work?

Mark “Metal” Wong: It’s really easy to get pretentious when you’re the only one up there. I’m trying my best not to be. But by nature, I think that all solo work is a little self-indulgent, so I try to embrace that and have fun with it to an extent as well.

Lily Kind: I agree with Mark. And I prefer a more vaudevillian theater tradition, where the audience is in more of a dialogue with the performer. By contrast, the traditional concert theater agreement is very safe for both performer and audience, and I think that can make for pretty boring solo work, where the artist has already surrendered any experimental elements by being inside a historically aristocratic construct.

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Happy Hour on the Fringe with Trey Lyford

Posted August 28th, 2018

FringeArts signature podcast continues with new series of enthralling Festival-related shows.

accountant

The Accountant. Photo by Jenna Spitz.

Philadelphia-based theater-creator Trey Lyford is co-artistic director, with Geoff Sobelle, of physical theater company rainpan 43, for which he has co-created Fringe Festival works such as all wear bowlers (2005) and Elephant Room (2011). Lyford also develops and produces works as an individual artist and as an associate artist with the Obie Award-winning company The Civilians. His work has been presented at Center Theatre Group, St. Ann’s Warehouse, HERE Arts Center, Arena Stage, ATL’s Humana Festival, and La Jolla Playhouse, among others.

His new work The Accountant premieres September 6–9 as part of the opening week program of the 2018 Fringe Festival

Listen now as hosts Zach Blackwood and Raina Searles chat with the longtime friend of the Fringe and occasional magician on the nature of memory, Trey’s artistic process, and the story behind his latest work.

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Shows from the Theater Canon

Posted August 28th, 2018

This year’s Fringe artists have looked to the past and taken inspiration from great playwrights and authors of the past. Check out these shows that create new work based on the theater canon. (There’s a noticeable absence: we covered Shakespeare in last week’s Festival Spotlight.) 

Samuel Beckett

accountant

The Accountant // Trey Lyford
In the forgotten office of an aging clerk, the tedium of everyday life transforms into a comical and haunting world of futility, remembrance and regret. The Accountant is a visual theater piece inspired by Samuel Beckett’s raw rumination on impermanence, Krapp’s Last Tape, and the disorientation that death can bring into our lives.
More info and tickets here

Company // EgoPo Classic Theater
Bring your blanket and pillow for a Beckett slumber party. EgoPo remounts their 2009 Fringe hit, which sold out in five cities. An immersive sensory experience, you are blindfolded on your back in the dark, the haunting text of modernist master Samuel Beckett’s short story “Company” whispered in your ear.
More info and tickets here

Sarah Kane

Phaedra’s Love // Svaha Theatre Collective
Phaedra is sexually obsessed with Hippolytus, her son. Hippolytus hates everyone and everything. The crown is burning and everybody is waiting for any excuse to rip the royal family to shreds. Literally. A riot erupts in gruesome hilarity because that’s just human nature, am I right? After producing Crave in 2016, Svaha returns with Phaedra’s Love by Sarah Kane, poete maudit of contemporary theater.
More info and tickets here

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NIGHTMARE FUEL Impresses Edinburgh Fringe Audiences Before Its Philly Fringe Premiere

Posted August 27th, 2018

“dark and demented…. what the Fringe is all about.”
—The Wee Review
“enough energetic idosyncrasy to become a cult hit.” ★★★★
—The London Student

Several entries into Philadelphia’s 2018 Fringe Festival got a full tryout at the mother of Fringes in Edinburgh, Scotland, which concludes today. Chris Davis treated Scottish audiences to his 2012 play Drunk Lion before his world premiere of The Presented this September. Lee Minora received plaudits for White Feminist, part of this year’s Festival in Philadelphia. The pair shared an apartment in Edinburgh with Sarah Knittel, whose NIGHTMARE FUEL is taking #EdFringe Twitter by storm.

“I didn’t expect people to be so on board with the show,” says Knittel. “I thought I would be heckled or hated for being American or saying ‘pussy’ 100x in the show. At first, the audience would respond with super UK-polite smiles and muffled laughs, but, by the end, people are shocking themselves with how much they are willing to play along.”

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Meg and Dana Are Troilus and Cressida in RevShakes Non-traditional Fringe Casting

Posted August 27th, 2018

Revolution Shakespeare’s outdoor performances in Bella Vista’s Hawthorne Park have become staple of FREE Fringe offerings. For their fifth Festival production, the company continues its tradition of producing fiercely modern takes on lesser-known Shakespeare works with Troilus and Cressida.

(l-r) Meg, Dana, and Sol Madariaga star in Troilus and Cressida.

Directed by star Philadelphia director Brenna Geffers, the staging of the Bard’s intriguing piece on star-crossed lovers in the Trojan War sees a gender-defying non-traditional casting, headlined by Meg Rumsey-Lasersohn and Dana Kreitz as the titular characters. FringeArts spoke to the pair about the play, their roles, and the importance of RevShakes’ unconventional casting.

FringeArts: What appealed to you about Troilus and Cressida?

Meg Rumsey-Lasersohn: I think I first read Troilus and Cressida in college, with a professor who LOVED it. And I remember being totally baffled the first time through—like, what IS this? It’s almost historical fanfiction. I was obsessed with Greek mythology and the Trojan war as a kid, so that has appealed to me for a long time, but  honestly, nothing appealed to me about Troilus. I thought he was an absolute jerk. That’s part of why I am excited to play the role—to find what I love in him, what I empathize with.

Dana Kreitz: The play was appealing to me in the way that it dealt with these iconic, fabled characters and Cressida was, and is, so wonderful for me to explore because she’s a woman doing her best with the cards she’s dealt. And she continuously gets some pretty shitty cards. And through it all, she keeps her wit. And she keeps her strength. And Shakespeare treats her with some kindness and mercy, I think, in his portrayal of her struggles and choices, and doesn’t simply write her off as the faithless lover that she’s known as being. She gets to be human.

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FringeArts Staff Picks for the 2018 Fringe Festival

Posted August 27th, 2018

The FringeArts staff really get to know the shows in each year’s Festival, chatting to the artists, writing about the shows, fielding calls, and making sure everything goes smoothly all Festival long. We asked some Fringers what they’re looking forward too this year.

We work here.

“I’m looking forward to Tania El Khoury’s collection of works ear-whispered: works by Tania El Khoury. With the intense conversation and policy changes surrounding immigration and asylum in this country, it is easy to forget real people with real stories are impacted. For that reason, El Khoury’s pieces are that much more timely.” —Sabrina Carter, Festival Communications Coordinator

“I am looking forward to Le Super Grand Continental. I think it represents the Fringe spirit so well: art in a non-traditional venue with non-professional artists coming together to create a magical dance party of all ages. It provides such a sense of community and fun, you can’t help but to be filled with joy.” —Melissa Bridge, Director of Finance and Administration

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Location, Location, Location: Plays & Players Theatre

Posted August 26th, 2018

Location: Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey Place

Neighborhood: Center City

2018 Fringe Shows: Lay Me Down Softly, Salamander, Shelter, White Feminist

Description: Situated on picturesque Delancey Place in one of Philadelphia’s most coveted neighborhoods, Plays & Players is an attractive unrenovated three-story building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Completed in 1912 by architect Amos W. Barnes, the building was used a dramatic school and a try-out theater for Broadway shows under the name “the Playhouse,” making the building one of the oldest theaters in continuous use in the United States.

Theater company Plays and Players (founded in 1913) bought the building in 1922 and continues to produce theater in the charming mainstage space and the smaller 3rd-floor black box, Skinner Studio, which takes its name from the company’s first president,  Maud Durbin Skinner. Next door Quigs, a private club for P&P members, serves beer and cocktails to audiences before and after most shows beneath theatrical wall paintings.u

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Feminism in the Fringe

Posted August 26th, 2018

In the era of #MeToo and the pink hat brigade, it’s no surprise that feminism and the celebration of women and their stories is a recurring theme of the shows in this year’s Festival. These works use different performance forms to reflect on women, feminism, and the modern world.  

Animation Nation
The Women’s Film Festival
The Women’s Film Festival presents an amazing collection of animated films by, for, or about women. Come get a taste of award-winning short films from local and international artists along with a preview of our nine-day festival in March! Bring an open mind with a dusting of imagination!
More info and tickets here

The F Word
Radiant Bloom Productions
What does feminism mean now? Five women from different backgrounds use music to experience the conviction of the movement for women’s rights. Hear the stories of women who fought for equality, join in the songs they sang. Immerse yourself in the ongoing discussions about who gets a place in this movement.
More info and tickets here

For Colored Girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf
Kaleidoscope Cultural Arts Collective
For Colored Girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf, Ntozake Shange’s first work, tells the stories of seven women who have suffered oppression in a racist and sexist society. The choreopoem is an innovative combination of poetry, drama, music, and dance.
More info and tickets here

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Comedy and Improv

Posted August 25th, 2018

Fringe artists are known for keeping audiences on their toes. Laugh out loud at these joyous comedy and improv shows that will leave you smiling and breathless.

An Unofficial, Unauthorized Tour of LOVE Park
Rose Luardo / Kate Banford
An interactive, questions-encouraged tour of LOVE Park with a completely legitimate, highly respected, and 100% real tour company. At each stop on this mind-bending guided walk through the park, facts will be manipulated and reality will melt. Maybe a bush will talk to you? And maybe that bush invented love. Presented by Philadelphia Parks & Recreation and the Fairmount Park Conservancy.
More info and tickets here

Darlings: Kill Us Please
Good Good Comedy Theatre
Darlings: Kill Us Please is the debut Fringe show from Darlings, a collective of Philadelphia’s most celebrated comedic heartthrobs. We’ve gutted the innards of a full year’s worth of shows at Good Good Comedy Theatre and only left in the juiciest bits and chunks.
More info and tickets here

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A Love Affair with Sarah Kane

Posted August 24th, 2018

In the mid-1990s, a young playwright took London theater by storm, producing five intense, provocative, controversial plays before she committed suicide in 1999 aged just 28. Sarah Kane divided critics and audiences, works such as Blasted and Crave dropping like powder kegs on the a complacent theater world. By the mid-200s, she was the most produced new playwright in the world. She’s only received a handful of production in Philadelphia, but Svaha Theatre Collective is trying to change that. After producing Kane’s Crave in 2016, the group return to the Fringe Festival with two works, an adaptation of a Shakespeare work and Kane’s Phaedra’s Love. With charged with, this contemporary adaptation of the Greek play focuses the audience’s attention on the cruelty which underlies human relationships.

Director Elise D’Avella writes about her love affair with Sarah Kane and what she finds appealing about her work:

My first encounter with Sarah Kane was at a production of Phaedra’s Love during the early days of my undergraduate career at the University of Pittsburgh when I was still flirting with theater as a mere acquaintance. It was love at first slice . . . I mean sight! I had never experienced anything like that before. I remember just sitting in my chair long after it had ended; short of breath, a little nauseous, nerves shot, and full to the brim with life. Which sounds cheesy, but I’m not sure how else to describe it. Sarah Kane’s plays have a way of stabbing you in the throat, gut, and groin until you are painfully, viscerally aware of your own humanity. It’s a hell of a trip and I’ve been chasing that feeling ever since.

As a director, I’m very interested in theater that generates a visceral response over a cerebral one. Although I believe theater should ask questions and produce possibilities, I think the danger of theater that is overly cerebral is that it begins to highlight and deepen divisions between opinions, political allegiances, and identity. Theater that attacks the senses and cuts through the surface to our very roots and what drives us as humans to survive can allow us to approach divisions from a place of understanding, empathy, and recognition.

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Family Friendly Fringe

Posted August 24th, 2018

The Fringe isn’t always adults only! Everyone is welcome at these fun, engaging performances suitable for the whole family.

Chichi Chip (an ode to the Gnarly)
Philly Kerplop
An interactive performance featuring hip-hop dance and a live marching band, taking place in Philly’s iconic LOVE Park. Philly Kerplop’s display of humor and daring physical dexterity will activate the park spaces in ways that feel both familiar and awe-inspiring.
More info and tickets here

FIGMAGO
Meg Saligman Studio
FIGMAGO is part art installation, part room escape, and all parts wonderfully immersive. Enter the mind of a muralist as you explore secret passages and mesmerizing art to discover a mysterious mural that comes to life. YOU become the artist as the story unfolds. Hands-on and phone-free fun for all ages!
More info and tickets here

Garden of Vessels
Sina Marie (I Am a Vessel Youth Initiative)
Welcome to the future of the pop-up garden phenomenon. Imagine a garden where imagination and technology fall in love, cultivating the minds and innate abilities of the youth to a full bloom. Visionary Sina Marie creates an interactive experience. A diaspora from the underground up! We welcome you to…the Garden of Vessels.
More info and tickets here

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Visual Art

Posted August 24th, 2018

Here at the Fringe, we love all types of art, not just performance! Come see this eclectic mix of visual art shows being displayed throughout the city and online.

Artworks Trenton & Common Threads Gallery Presents…
Common Threads Gallery / Artworks Trenton
Exhibitions and programs taking place at Artworks Trenton include two exhibitions, Art of the Counterculture (TPRFM) and Pride and Prejudice (André Terrel Jackson); song craft by Danielia Cotton; and a featured performance by master storyteller Denise McCormack (see above). See website for a breakdown of events.
More info and tickets here

A Stroke of Luck
Tom Luther
A Stroke of Luck is an audio/visual reflection on my experience of having a stroke, and the subsequent recovery process. It combines video, still photography, and audio using generative methods and fixed forms.
More info and tickets here

Color
Ellen Duong
Color is an interactive watercolor effect, non-photorealistic renderer that displays a 3D scene as if it were a watercolor painting with interactive artistic UI tools. This project was originally developed as part of the 2018 Interactive Mechanics Fellowship Program and has been extended.
More info and tickets here

Cycles
William Stallwood
An exploration of visual design through emergent systems, part of the Digital Fringe offerings in the 2018 Fringe Festival. All Digital Fringe shows go live by September 6 and are FREE and ongoing all Festival long.
More info and tickets here

ear whispered

As Far As My Fingertips Take Me. Photo by

ear-whispered: works by Tania El Khoury
Tania El Khoury
Working between Lebanon and the United Kingdom, Tania El Khoury meticulously crafts innovative performances and installations that engage the audience in multi-sensory interaction. These five interactive installations and performances take place at sites at Bryn Mawr College and at art galleries in Old City.
More info and tickets here

FIGMAGO
Meg Saligman Studio
FIGMAGO is part art installation, part room escape, and all parts wonderfully immersive. Enter the mind of a muralist as you explore secret passages and mesmerizing art to discover a mysterious mural that comes to life. YOU become the artist as the story unfolds. Hands-on and phone-free fun for all ages!
More info and tickets here

One Hundred Abstracts
Katharine Goodall
This is an exhibition of paintings displayed in various locations throughout the city.
More info and tickets here

Pareidolic Expanses
Orlando Saverino-Loeb
Solo exhibition by Orlando Saverino-Loeb with paintings that stem from an exploration of visual primary sources. “How can I make a painting that eliminates what I want to force on the viewer? I want to give more power to the viewer, because I’ve always thought that the viewer is more important than the painter.”
More info and tickets here

Shelter: A Sculpture Exhibition
Da Vinci Art Alliance / Philadelphia Sculptors
Juried by Elaine Crivelli, this group exhibition features thoughtful and original three-dimensional artworks exploring the idea of shelter.
More info and tickets here

Works on Paper
Da Vinci Art Alliance
A group exhibition, juried by Moe Brooker. While thematically open, this exhibition features the diverse and tactile nature of work with and on paper including drawing or painting on paper; hand-pulled, photographic, or digital prints; collage; and paper constructions. Image: Moe Brooker, Future Memories, mixed media.
More info and tickets here

Fringe is pretty as a picture!

 

2018 Festival Spotlight: Circus Shows

Posted August 23rd, 2018

Contemporary circus is a growing genre in the performing art world, especially here in Philadelphia, and this year, Fringe artists are exploring its potential. Don’t miss these shows that push movement to new extremes!

Circadium Presents: Autopilot / Galactic Garden Party
Circadium
Double bill: Autopilot is a circus-based examination of how life’s instructions are given, taught, or learned, and how we navigate life with and without those instructions. Galactic Garden Party utilizes juggling, dance, scientific lectures, and theater to show the wonders of Earth, and what lies beyond the atmosphere in the cosmos.
More info and tickets here

Dead Flowers Circus Sideshow
Dead Flowers Circus Sideshow
Avant-garde performance ensemble Dead Flowers Circus Sideshow presents a veritable filth olympics. Mind and gender-bending spectacle, entertainment guaranteed. You may witness: A demonic clown host! Omnisexual burlesque! Heavy metal standup! Extreme acts of Sadomasochism! An authentic Arabian dance! Some Rock & Roll! Audience participation is not required, but volunteers have a lot of fun. No one bleeds but the performers.
More info and tickets here

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Chuck Schultz Is That Guy Sketching the Fringe

Posted August 23rd, 2018

Who’s that guy sketching in the back of this Fringe show? It’s probably (though not necessarily) Chuck Schultz, a fine art-trained sketch artist. Schultz’s sketches of dance and theater provide a visual review of Philadelphia performing arts year-round and he brings his talents to bear on numerous Festival shows every year.

Schultz recently sketched FIGMAGO, an ongoing mesh of art and dance which runs as part of the 2018 Fringe Festival. He spoke to FringeArts about how his work intersects similarly with different art forms.

FIGMAGO

FringeArts: What’s your background?

Chuck Schultz: I grew up in New Jersey. I lived on a farm. When my parents divorced I lived on the Jersey Shore. I liked to draw people, or super heroes, and when I met another artist in Toms River, NJ, I decided that is what I am: an artist. I first attended Delaware College of Art and Design in Wilmington and I moved on to get a certificate of fine art painting at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.


When I graduated college I tried to weave myself into where artists could find work. I been fortunate to be able to work with author Thom Nickels, photographer Katherine Weber, Thomas Kerrigan at the Kimmel Center, hairstylist Julius Scissor, and writer Chris Munden. I worked with an exceptional couple in Conshohocken: Jim Victor and Marie Pelton, alumni of PAFA. They are making food sculptures that give you an appetite! It is that effect that I am trying to copy.

FringeArts: How did you get into sketching theater?

Chuck Schultz: I always wondered what was happening inside theaters. I would just walk by while getting from point A to point B and I felt there must be something special inside them. When my father died in 2011, I began spending a lot of my time painting in Ocean Grove, NJ, where I met David Bates, a retired actor from the 60s who worked in movies, theater, commercials, and helped start The Muppets with Jim Henson. It was only natural for me to draw what I saw when going to the theater. It made me feel connected to the artists.

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Sorority of Storytelling: Sisters Combine Choreography and Bodypainting in Paprika Plains

Posted August 22nd, 2018

Natalie Fletcher and Jessica Noel are two talented creative sisters, but they’ve never performed on stage together… until this Fringe.

Fletcher, winner of the inaugural season of the body painting reality competition show, Skin Wars, will team up with Noel, a dance-theater artist who directs performance/education space and performance company Philly PACK, in an interdisciplinary storytelling performance inspired by singer Joni Mitchell’s 1977 album Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter. Paprika Plains will run September 21 and 22 at 7 p.m. at the Philly PACK garage in South Philadelphia.

Natalie Fletcher bodypainting.

“This collaboration is something we’ve wanted to do for a while, but the timing was never right, until now,” said Fletcher.

Fletcher and Noel spent their childhood in Amarillo on the plains of West Texas and the sisters’ production tells a story of two sisters growing up in West Texas, finding their individual paths, but always coming back together with a common language: love. Lily Blaines-Sussman, a member of the Philly PACK company, will dance as the young dancing sister, and Noel will dance as the adult. At various times throughout the production, the dancers will pause and Fletcher will come in to the performance, painting the dancers, the backdrop, while pushing the story along.

“We are attempting to tell a story with choreography and bodypainting,” says Noel. It’s a truly interdisciplinary Fringe performance: There is also a sculptural installation, theatrical lighting elements, and live music—Philadelphia musician Heather Blakeslee of Sweetbriar Rose will play Joni Mitchell covers as the audience enters.

“We want to transport the audience to a very specific world as soon as they enter,” adds Noel. “The world is Joni Mitchell and paint. Heather and the bartenders will be painted by Natalie before the show starts. The whole project is somewhat of an installation.”

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A Super Grand Interview with Sylvain Émard

Posted August 22nd, 2018

Renowned dancer and choreographer Sylvain Émard’s infectious fusion of traditional line dancing and contemporary dance, Le Grand Continental ®, has been presented at locations around the world, including Canada, the United States, Mexico, South Korea, New Zealand, and Chile. After presenting his show in the 2012 Fringe Festival, Émard is back in Philadelphia with Le Super Grand Continental, an even bigger public dance spectacle.

Presented as part of the 2018 Fringe Festival, Le Super Grand Continental will see a cast of 200 non-professional dancers take over the famous steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, performing all new choreography and eventually inviting the audience to join them as the performance space becomes an open-air dance party. FringeArts talked to Émard about the inspiration for the show, his memories of the 2012 Fringe Festival, and what we should expect this year.

FringeArts: What inspired the first Le Grand Continental®?

Sylvain Émard: As a kid, the first time I danced outside my home was at our church basement where there were line-dancing classes. Maybe that is why I was and still am fascinated by line dancing. To a point where I was often incorporating it (a bit more sophisticated I must say) in my stage work. Then I came up with this idea of choreographing a dance piece that would mix contemporary dance and line dancing. At first I thought that this would just appeal to Montréalers because of the great popularity of line dancing here. To my surprise, I realized that although line dancing is not that popular everywhere, there is a desire for the people to get involved in an artistic project and dance is perfect for that. It has no language limitation. It is somehow universal despite the specificity of the style.

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Happy Hour on the Fringe with Heiner Goebbels

Posted August 21st, 2018

FringeArts signature podcast returns with the first episode in a new series of enthralling Festival-related shows.

Frankfurt-based composer and director Heiner Goebbels has had his work produced around the world including his native Germany, Switzerland, England and New York. He taught for nearly 20 years at the Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen (1999–2018) and served as president of the Theatre Academy Hessen for twelve years (2006–2018). He was the artistic director of the International Festival of the Arts Ruhrtriennale for two years and and received the first appointment for the newly established Georg Büchner Professorship in 2018.

His works Stifters Dinge and Songs of Wars I Have Seen will be produced in Philadelphia in the 2018 Fringe Festival September 7 –9.

Listen now to the conversation between FringeArts president and producing director Nick Stuccio and world renown composer and director Heiner Goebbels covering Goebbels’ seminal works and long career.

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2018 Festival Spotlight: Shakespeare in the Fringe

Posted August 21st, 2018

No theater is more timeless than the work of Shakespeare. The artists behind these Festival shows honor the Bard of Avon’s legacy with new twists on his immortal classics.  

As You Like It
Indecorous Theatre Productions
Do you like the woods? Do you like crossdressing lesbian princesses? Do you like people who are incapable of expressing their deepest emotions? Then pack a picnic and join us for this unconventional production of Shakespeare’s greatest romantic comedy As You Like It in the gorgeous Spring Gardens Community Garden.
More info and tickets here

Long Trouble
Svaha Theatre Collective
Adapted from William Shakespeare and John Fletcher’s Henry VIII, this new work calls attention to the trials and tribulations of Queen Catherine, her daughter Mary, and her lady-in-waiting Anne Boleyn.
More info and tickets here

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Something to Chew On: Boris Charmatz on manger

Posted August 20th, 2018

Boris Charmatz subjects dance to formal constraints which redefine the field of its possibilities: a potentially infinite canon of gestures in his 2016 Fringe Festival piece Levée des conflits, inert bodies of children, animated by adult dancers in enfant. The stage is a notepad where he jots down ideas and organic concepts in order to observe the chemical reactions, the intensities, and the tensions engendered in their encounter. In manger, the center of gravity was subject to displacement: how to set bodies in motion not with the eyes, or with the limbs, but with the mouth? Gilles Amalvi talked to Boris Charmatz in 2013 about the ideas behind this delectable contemporary work.

Featured in the 2018 Fringe Festival, manger is presented in partnership with Westphal College of Media Arts & Design as part of Philadelphia Museum of Dance.

Gilles Amalvi: An important starting idea for you was the “not very spectacular” dimension of the action of eating, swallowing. Is this line of thought still relevant?

Boris Charmatz: Absolutely. The creation, as I now see it, increasingly tends towards a form of disappearance: treating food in terms of swallowing it, blotting it out. But then, this calls for careful, precise planning, very unlike the rather raw principle that I had initially envisaged. To tackle the dimension of disappearance, the dimension of blockage, of impediment—in speaking, dancing—I find some subtle, precise mechanisms, bordering on invisibility in order not to just dangle in front of the audience a vision of bodies in the process of ingesting.

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Location, Location, Location: The Adrienne

Posted August 19th, 2018

Are you in the market for a Fringe show? Does it have to be close to some good restaurants? Have some great theater? Great amenities? A quality school catchment?

Welcome to our new series of real estate guides to Fringe venues all around Philadelphia.

Location: The Adrienne, 2030 Sansom Street (Center City)

Peg! by Kylie Westerbeck at the Adrienne this Fringe!

2018 Fringe shows: Peg!, Pillow Talk, Real America, powerpoints for my friends, Quidity: Migration Patterns of Imaginary Things, a PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION (of the EFFECTS of KINESTHETIC OCULAR NEURO-PSYCHOLOGY and its POTENTIAL as an AID in the DISCOVERY of SELF), Almost Pregnant, The Arcane Mysteries of Vanderslice Manor, Close Your Legs, Honey: A New Musical, Drawn Out, FEEL, Only In Your Dreams, Song of My Self-Care, Villain

Description: Located in the heart of Rittenhouse Square area, Philadelphia’s premiere residential and business district, the Adrienne Theater is a charming yet vibrant three-story performance space. With easy access to public transportation, a parking garage across the street, a myriad of dining options in the immediate vicinity, a wealth of cultural organizations, and the PFS Roxy (movie) Theater on the block, the 2000 block of Sansom Street is the destination of choice for local nightlife.

Named for theater professional Adrienne Neye, the Adrienne has been home to dozens of Philadelphia theater companies, some of which (the Wilma Theatre, InterAct Theatre) outgrew the space including, some of which (Venture Theater, Theatre Catalyst) burned bright and went dark. It’s now the leading center for improv in the city, housing the Philly Improv Theater and ComedySportz Philadelphia.

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