< BLOG

Archive for the ‘Neighborhood Fringe’ Category

Making Art in 2017: Joshuah D. Simpson on It Takes One

Posted August 20th, 2017

Joshuah D. Simpson. Photo by Cass Meehan.

Name: Joshuah D. Simpson

Company: The University of the Arts

Show in 2017 FestivalIt Takes One

Role in Show: Performer, Writer

Past Festival showsYou Can’t Put Me in a Box

FringeArts: Tell us about your show. 

Joshuah Simpson: This show came out of my problematically zealous passion for musical theater, but more specifically Into the Woods. This show has taught me a great deal about the world around me, and made me realize that in a world where we’re used to all necessary information being spoon fed to us through social media, hidden messages from shows like this are often looked over. My hope is that It Takes One reminds audiences of the connective tissue that all humans share as moving cogs in this world, and find the innate similarities between us while getting a good laugh and maybe even a few tears.

FAHow have your interests in or approach to art making changed in the last year? 

Joshuah D. Simpson. Photo by Ethan Abrams.

Joshuah Simpson: I have undergone a lot of changes this year as a theater artist, the most important being the realization that none of us are held to any one position in the grand scope of theater. There are so many roles to take on, and realizing that I’m capable of more than just one or two things really turned me around a bit. More specifically to this show, before this year I had only ever been a spectator of cabarets, but have found myself taking a more and more of an active part, and finding a new love with in the theater world that I’m really excited to share with the Philly community.

Read More

Making Art in 2017: Carl(os) Roa on Andean Mountains (Montañas Andinas)

Posted August 18th, 2017

Carl(os) Roa, practicing the ancient art of ruanamancy; Photo by Talia Mason.

Name: Carl(os) Roa

2017 Festival ShowAndean Mountains (Montañas Andinas)

Role: Writer, Performer

Past Festival showsAE$OP and Parts: A Speed-Through, both of which were produced by the Drexel Players. Shout-out to my alma-mater: Drexel University!

FringeArtsTell us about your show. 

Carl(os) Roa: I have an obsession with Google Maps, globetrotting, and geography. I spend some of my downtime exploring different cities with Google Street View, and it didn’t take me very long to discover that you could explore much of Colombia, where my family lived. And I started thinking a lot about giving tours of Colombia live via projection. But ultimately, I knew that these tours were largely limited to my own understanding of Colombian culture, having grown up here in the States. My experience was radically different from one who grew up in a place like Bogotá or Medellín. That in itself became artistically salient to me, these big questions of: How do people of a diaspora access a culture that they’ve been displaced from? Where do we go when the map is missing pieces?

FringeArtsHow have your interests in or approach to art making changed in the last year? 

Performing at SoLow Fest. Photo by Annemarie Branco.

Carl(os) Roa: I think my experience with the Headlong Performance Institute really twisted my artistic brain. I spent four months hanging out with dancers, visual artists, community organizers, and even electronic musicians – people who forced me to think in a very different way about me and my work. I’ve been eternally grateful for these interdisciplinary discoveries.

Read More

Finding Reality in a Dream: Alison Hoban of the Found Theater Company

Posted August 18th, 2017

Adrienne Hertler, Joe Wozniak, Kristy Joe Slough, Ciara Collins, Matt Lorenz, and Joe Palinsky in Game Show Show.

Working in the surreal world between dreams and reality, the Found Theater Company presents their eighth original Fringe Festival show this September. The group works as a collective in Philadelphia, and devises works like this year’s Game Show Show around a central theme, such as the televised game show. While the premise is light, it’s used as a vehicle to a comment on the current state of disarray that the United States continues to fall into. “Found always works inside of this kind of in between world, where we straddle reality and a dream state,” says director Alison Hoban. “We’re (hopefully) able to take the audience to heightened, otherworldly places, while also being able to reach them as people with real human experience: heartache, love, success, failure.” Founded under the direction of Felipe Vergara, the company creates their shows by using a theme and building a narrative step-by-step, a process that has evolved over time. Alison Hoban has been with the company through it all, as their elected director after Felipe. I talked with her about her artistic roots, and how this show came to be.

Kristy Joe Slough in Game Show Show.

FringeArts: Where did you grow up, and how did you first become involved in the arts?

Alison Hoban: I’m from Wayne, PA, right outside of the city. My family wasn’t involved in the arts, but my parents always encouraged creativity throughout my life. They made it possible for me to take dance classes and be involved in theater from when I was young. I took and taught dance lessons through school. I spent a few summers at Upper Darby Summer Stage. But I really fell in love with theatre at Radnor High School under the direction of Mary Anne Morgan.

FringeArts: Who are some artists that you look up to?

Alison Hoban: Oh man, there are so many! I feel overwhelming lucky to be a part of the Philadelphia theater community. There are some amazing makers creating new works here. I was in the first class of The Headlong Performance Institute in 2008 and met a lot of them there. Headlong Dance Theatre has been a long time favorite. Seeing the care they take of themselves and each other during the creation process was inspiring. That was the year I saw one of Nicole Canuso’s works (Wandering Alice) for the first time too and it blew me away. It remains one of my favorite things I’ve seen in this city. I always look forward to seeing what other makers in the city are into and am always excited to see new works by Lightning Rod Special, Almanac, Sam Tower + Ensemble, the Philadelphia Opera Collective and so, so, so many others.

Read More

Making Art in 2017: Michaela Shuchman on Airswimming

Posted August 17th, 2017

(Left to right) Michelle Johnson and Michaela Shuchman. Photo by Steve Weinik.

Name: Michaela Shuchman

Company: Half Key Theatre Company

2017 Festival Show: Airswimming

Role in Production: Performer

Past Festival shows: Scarlet Letters with Ross & Diggs

FringeArtsTell us about your show. 

Michaela Shuchman: Set in 1920s Ireland, Airswimming by Charlotte Jones is based on the true story of two women imprisoned in a mental hospital for daring to challenge society’s definition of womanhood. Forgotten by the world, Dora and Persephone come together for one hour each day to clean and find connection. Through sheer force of will, friendship, and a penchant for Doris Day, they redefine their world and resist confinement for over fifty years. Airswimming explores female identity and friendship at a time in Irish history when mental health and women’s issues converged. Jones takes the imagined circumstances of two real imprisoned women and asks: How do we express and accept ourselves when our freedoms have been taken away? How can finding connection with another person help us better understand ourselves? What does Doris Day have to do with any of this? Airswimming speaks to the desire in all of us to be free from societal constraints, to dance and be weird and wacky with our best friends, and to find meaning in the most unexpected of places. 

Read More

Fun Woke Giving: Interview with Cookie Diorio

Posted August 17th, 2017

Credit : Pink Melon Media

“Stay woke and have fun” has become the motto drag songstress Cookie Diorio adopted to describe her philanthropic show Art of the Heel. Though many artists are civically engaged and tie their work into giving back to their respective communities, few do it in such a unique way as Cookie—one of Philly’s most talented drag queens. With Art of the Heel, Cookie is beautiful, comedic, and grounding all at once—a hard plethora of traits to balance in one performance. We reached out to Cookie to learn more about the passion and creativity behind this show.

FringeArts: What was the initial inspiration for Art of the Heel and the social justice aspect woven into it?

Cookie: Since November 2016 I have been intrigued by and experimenting with the idea of civically engaged art. I was constantly asking myself how I could use what I do as a singer, songwriter and drag artist to help promote social justice. I decided just to “do what I do” in a way that allows my audience to engage with and learn about different social issues and the organizations tackling them. Art Of The Heel as a project was directly inspired by a concert that I did last winter to raise funds and awareness for The Attic LGBT Youth Center.The name, thought up by my brilliant husband, is a play on the title of a well known book with the last word replaced with HEEL to represent what I do as a drag queen (and I don’t wear heels shorter than 5 inches!).

FringeArts: What attracted you to the three charities that you chose to be part of Art of the Heel?

Cookie: I have the utmost respect and admiration for the folks at Valley Youth House, Women In Transition and PennFuture. These organizations do amazing and hard work to propel our community forward and I value that greatly. In my cabaret acts, I talk a lot about my personal life and experiences. Many of those experiences have been shaped by some of the same issues that these organizations tackle: I have close friends and family who have struggled with homelessness and housing insecurity, I grew up in a matriarchal family and have seen the effects of gender-based violence and drug abuse, and I grew up in a rural community very much in touch with the environment. I have always been taught to stand up for the things that I believe in and I am proud to lift my voice in support of these causes.

Read More

Making Art in 2017: Noa Schnitzer on The Currency of Belief

Posted August 16th, 2017

Noa Schnitzer. Photo by Heather Dawn Sparks.

Name: Noa Schnitzer

2017 Festival Show: The Currency of Belief: Trapeze and Spiritual Comedy

Role in Production: Creator, Performer

FringeArtsTell us about your show. 

Noa Schnitzer: I am engaged in exploring the intangible elements that make up the gap between who we are and who we want to be, as a solo entity and as a community. To begin illuminating this gap is to understand where we come from as individuals. In this show, religion and gender are put under my artistic microscope. I grew up in an Orthodox Jewish community and decided to stop practicing at the age of eighteen. Over the years, prayers from this past pop up in my mind and stay with me for days. The fact that fifteen years later these prayers have an  involuntary voice in my mind got me thinking about the strength and significance of prayer, practice, and identity in community. In The Currency of Belief, the voice of prayer holds space for the hidden seams in this one life I am exploring: my own. Through these illuminations a question arises, Is there anything that prayer is not?

FringeArts: How have your interests in or approach to art making changed in the last year? 

Photo by Abigail Bell, Michelle Bates and Heather Dawn Sparks.

Noa Schnitzer: I am more proactive in reaching out to people that I want to collaborate with. The thing that I always need to practice accepting is that my art is important, and while conventional parameters of success are an amplifier for my ego, I am the main amplifier of my ideas.

Read More

Filipino Folkdance, Contemporary Ballet, and Motherhood: Annielille Gavino Kollman’s HERstory

Posted August 11th, 2017

Annielille Gavino Kollman in HERstory.

What do you get when you combine modern choreography, folkdance polyrhythms, and a baby? The dances of Annielille Gavino Kollman bring together eastern and western styles, while incorporating many other disciplines, and using a group of dancers diverse in both race and generation. Her newest work, HERstory, is a three-part production that investigates the theme of motherhood and culture, and is supported by the Small But Mighty Art Grant. Annielille’s dance is about her homeland (the Philippines) as a mother and acts as a celebration and portrait of the women there and around the world. She first learned dance as a folkdancer, and now incorporates the styles from her country into contemporary movements. Much of the work is autobiographical, expressing her experience as a mother and as a Filipina woman, but it also includes the backstories of the other dancers, who contribute vibrant rhythms by clapping, stomping, and yelling. Additionally, HERstroy features spoken word through poetry written by the dancers and Lenora Howard, film projection by Jasmine Lynea Callis, and music composed by Maya Simonee.

Born in the Philippines, Annielille lived there until coming to New York after college. She attended the The Ailey School of dance in 2000, which caters to minorities who were often overlooked in the world of ballet and modern dance. She left the country “on impulse” but she also left to escape extremely difficult circumstances. She was tired of being silenced as a woman, and of experiences of abuse by men.  “I was too vocal. I think that was the problem for them. I was too strong to be a submissive wife.” She had been dancing since she could remember, and was a highly skilled folkdancer. “It was just a way for me to get out of the country so I just followed that, because I was good at it. It became cathartic to me, too, so I just kept doing it.”

After studying at Ailey, she danced around the United States for different companies, touring in Colorado, and then in Texas. Later she moved to Virginia, where she found very little creative dance, and a society that was less accepting of her than they had been in New York. “It was very segregated,” she says. “Being in a place where I saw Confederate flags every day of my life, I started to make art. I became a political artist at first, and more of a performance artist.” She had her daughter, and started teaching her dance. “When I didn’t have an outlet for dance, I started teaching her texture, colors, and letters through dance.” She also started choreographing for a Filipino folk dance group, and began teaching her folk dances. She moved to Philadelphia two years ago, a welcome change. “I liked the grit, and a little bit of a faster pace. I love the row houses, and the little streets, where people can connect easier than in wider, suburban space. I feel more at home in cities like this.” Once in Philadelphia, she started dancing for Kun-Yang Li/Dancers, and soon, creating her own projects.

Read More

In “Urgent Care,” The Colored Girls Museum Offers Itself as a Sanctuary and First Responder

Posted July 28th, 2017

“Chamber” by Joy Ude and Petra Floyd

Walking down Newhall Street in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, it’s hard to tell that one of these houses is not like the others. After a moment, you’ll find a wooden sign for The Colored Girls Museum (TCGM) outside of a 128-year-old Victorian twin. Since 2015, TCGM has been quietly redefining the role of museums in Philadelphia. The house is the home of the founder and executive director of the museum, Vashti Dubois. She founded the museum as a celebration of women of color, as well as a living memoir and sanctuary. Michael Clemmons is the curator for the museum, and has known and worked with Vashti for many years. “I think that what our museum does is very unique, distinct from everything else that’s out there,” he says. “In many ways, it’s the only museum of its kind.” From July 29 to July 30, the museum will be presenting its last showings of the current show, Urgent Care: A Good Night’s Sleep, before closing to prepare for its Fringe Festival event, Urgent Care: A Social Care Experience.

TCGM is telling a story that few other art spaces are, in a way that uses art as a place for conversation. The museum is a living monument “for the ordinary and extraordinary colored girl,” bringing her voice out highlighting her concerns. “When you shine the light on anything,” says Vashti, “you begin to notice its extraordinary qualities, but you have to look at it first.” The museum’s exhibitions respond to current social issues, and the “Urgent Care” shows reflect heightened concerns for women of color after the 2016 election. There is a huge variety of beautiful and fascinating objects throughout the house, which are a conglomeration of  historical artifacts and new works of art. Artists who work with the museum either submit their own work, curate a space, or add objects from their own past or family history that are significant to the space’s collective memoir. “Those objects have a story that is important to the woman submitting them,” says Michael, “which is curated into the space.” The museum leaders and staff refer to the museum with she/her pronouns, speaking of the space as a person, rather than a stagnant building. Vashti explains how this reflects the moving and changing aspects of the museum: objects come and go, and rooms within her walls change to reflect changing times.  “The concept in a way is very simple,” says Michael. “In a sense, it’s a story that hasn’t been told, and it should be told. It’s very much a home, it’s relaxing, and it’s a different kind of museum experience.”

Second Floor Bedroom, or “Recovery Suite” in “Urgent Care”

Walking into Salon 1, on the first floor, the museum already feels entirely different from any other galleries. Rather than white walls and echoing hallways, this is a home. Salon 1 is a part of the semi-permanent collection, and many works of art were a part of the inaugural exhibition in 2015. The paintings on the wall are hung in a “salon style,” covering the space, and are interspersed with small statues, old portrait photographs, and personal artifacts, including a singular knee-high tie-dye boot. There are very few name cards on the walls— instead, everyone who comes into the museum is brought on a tour. Through conversation, guests learn which paintings on the wall are by Barbara Bullock, a celebrated African American artist in Germantown that Michael described as almost a “mother figure” in the Philadelphia arts community. There are quilts from fiber artist Toni Kersey, and doll figures by Lorrie Patrice Payne. The experience is intimate and allows for conversations about the art — often, with the artists themselves.

Read More

Duende Meets Brotherly Love

Posted August 31st, 2016

“We have come to understand duende as a fire that burns in our blood and reveals itself in a wave of emotion too wild for anyone to control.”

duende2In 1933 Federico Garcia Lorca popularized the term duende, describing a heightened state of emotion in art, a deep animalistic force in people, that he only felt to be present in some forms of art—theatre being one, flamenco being another. In 2016 Philadelphia’s Duende Cycle reinvents his idea in the Fringe Festival. They perform two shows in repertory: Lorca’s Bodas de Sangre and I Only Came to Use the Phone, a devised piece based on a short story by Gabriel Garcia Márquez. “Both shows dive into the theme of unjust societal gender roles, but through the lens of flowering language and beautifully strange imagery,” say creators Eliana Fabiyi and Tanaquil Márquez.

I Only Came to Use the Phone takes place in modern day Miami — an intentional choice on the part of the Duende Cycle. “There can always be more voices to reflect the beautifully diverse country we live in, and we want to add to that burgeoning noise,” Fabiyi and Márquez explain, adding that theater in Philadelphia is visible in the increasing representation of stories of color across American theater communities. The ensemble of the Duende Cycle is simultaneously thoroughly Philadelphian and impressively diverse, bringing more than six culturally different Latino backgrounds to the table. Some of these include Puerto Rican, Mexican, Ecuadorian, Venezuelan, Argentinian and Colombian. Philly, which boasts so many culturally thriving communities, is known for living up to its trademark: brotherly love.  The project, with all its cultural influences, celebrates the city’s Latino diversity,” they say.duende1

The project has been in the making for the past year, but devised work changed the script of I Only Came to Use the Phone dramatically, and the balance of English and Spanish in Bodas de Sangre was finally reached at the end of July. The Duende Cycle continues to grapple with ways to empower the female protagonists, balancing the integrity of original text and the desire to expose modern discrimination.

Come see Bodas de Sangre and I Only Came to Use the Phone September 16 – 21.

Instagram | Facebook

Bodas de Sangre/ I Only Came to Use the Phone
Asian Arts Initiative
1219 Vine Street
September 16- 8:00pm Bodas de Sangre
September 17- 8:00pm I Only Came to Use the Phone
September 18- 2:00pm Bodas de Sangre
September 18- 7:00pm I Only Came to Use the Phone
September 20- 7:00pm Bodas de Sangre
September 21- 7:00pm I Only Came to Use the Phone

—Emily Dombrovskaya

Fringe Festival 2016 Spotlight: Philadelphia Museums in the Fringe

Posted August 17th, 2016

Museums come to life in these upcoming Fringe shows! Be sure to catch them all before the exhibits run away.

The Eumenides @ The Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

1821-34bd11deb7c0f18bffd9fbb89a63624e

White Box Theater, directed by Marcia Ferguson

Third in Aeschylus’ classic Oresteia trilogy, performed amidst extraordinary ancient artifacts in Penn’s Museum. A story about mother-murder, the foundations of our juried justice system, and shifts in world order—gorgeous, and elegant, a substantial work. More info and tickets here.

Colored Girls Museum Presents A Good Nights Sleep_The Colored Girls MuseumThe Colored Girls Museum Presents: A Good Nights Sleep

The Colored Girls Museum

The Colored Girls Museum is an apostate arts colony, headquartered in the backwoods of Germantown. Settled by a collective of nomadic travelers, the Colored Girls Museum (CGM) re-imagines the museum as an imaginative & restorative temple that nurtures and celebrates the “Ordinary, Extraordinary Colored Girl.” More info and tickets here.

 

Room 21 @ the Barnes Foundation

MAX_0689

Jace Clayton

This site-specific performance is an inspired musical response to the artworks of Room 21 at the Barnes Foundation and Albert Barnes’ extensive record collection. The actual Room 21 displays an eclectic mix of Pennsylvania German furniture, Modigliani’s painting Reclining Nude from the Back, African masks, religious works, and paintings by Barnes students. Composer Jace Clayton (also known as DJ /rupture) plays on ideas of adjacency between vastly different artists and cultures. Carefully choreographed, Clayton’s concert rewards roaming through the performance, much like visitors roam through the art collection. More info and tickets here.

Read More