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Posts Tagged ‘Vampyr’

A Dreadful Sound

Posted October 30th, 2017

In describing their mission, Not So Silent Cinema notes, “Some suffer from the delusion that the history of cinema is a straight-line of progress from primitive, clumsy beginnings to high-tech, modern perfection.” This ever-changing ensemble of musicians—helmed by Philadelphia-based composer Brendan Cooney—provide a much more engaging means of dispelling this delusion than streaming a classic to your computer. Performing new original scores to accompany silent film classics, they manage to invoke the manner in which these films were originally presented and bring a fresh perspective to material we may believe we already know well. This Halloween night, Not So Silent Cinema will perform their new score for Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1932 film Vampyr live here at FringeArts. The film was the largely unheralded but supremely influential filmmaker’s only explicit foray into the world of horror and a watershed achievement for the genre and film itself.

Cooney’s scores in NSSC’s repertoire are always a diverse melange of musical styles, composed to fit the film’s aesthetic, but unafraid to add some modern experimentation. As he describes it, “This is not historical performance, but rather it’s historically evocative performance.” His score for Vampyr fits this bill perfectly. Imbued with an old-world, Eastern-European atmosphere, the music suits the gloomy environs we’ve come to associate with vampires, but additional electronic production gives it a dark, transcendental element that calls to mind the soundtrack work of later horror greats like John Carpenter. If that sounds a little bit disparate in theory, in practice it melds surprisingly well to the film’s evocative unraveling, paying respect to it’s context while also nodding to its legacy as a pioneering psychological horror film.

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