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Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia Artists’ Collective’

Nowhere to Hide: PAC’s Iphigenia At Aulis

Posted August 30th, 2017

Pictured: Nathan Foley, Tai Verley Credit: Daniel Kontz Design

The Philadelphia Artists’ Collective is joining us this festival with their take on the strong and dynamic Greek Drama Iphigenia At Aulis. To help bring this classical piece to life they will hold it aboard the USS Olympia where both audiences and actors alike will be face to face in the intimate and unique space. Recently we reached out to Dan Hodge, the director of Iphigenia At Aulis, to get his thoughts on a few topics regarding the piece.

FringeArts: What attracted PAC to this particular piece

Dan Hodge: Iphigenia has actually been on our short list for several years. In Clytemnestra, it has one of the greatest leading female roles in Greek Drama and offers something substantial and rewarding for all of the central figures in the play. With its tense gender politics and the focus on personal sacrifice balanced against blind nationalism and warmongering, this seems like a really excellent piece to be exploring right now. The human costs of waging war are thrown into incredibly sharp relief when one has to choose the sacrifice of a child before the military can depart. It’s pretty strong stuff.

FringeArts: What do you feel are the main topics and themes brought up in Iphigenia at Aulis

Dan Hodge: It ultimately all comes back to family and trust. At the center of the piece we have this very tight family unit that is torn apart thanks to a hunger to maintain the pride of a country. We see how the women struggle to find agency and power in a social order stacked against them. And the choices they make are challenging and surprising.

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Old City Fringe: PAC Presents The Captive

Posted August 3rd, 2015

“It’s a story about people who desperately need to love and be loved, and yet seem incapable of being honest and present for each other.”

Ladies and gentlemen, the creators of last year’s Fringe hit The Rape of Lucrece are back with another revamped classic! This September, Philadelphia Artists’ Collective (PAC) brings Edouard Bourdet’s The Captive to the historical Physick House in Old City. With this play, PAC tackles issues of sex, domesticity, and class manners. Performed in The 1926 production in New York stirred a lot of controversy—what kind of conversations will it start in 2015? We caught up with The Captive director, and PAC founding member, Dan Hodge to talk about this exciting new project. 

The-Captive_Philadelphia-Artists-Collective FringeArts: The Captive faced some controversy in its original production in 1926. What kind of story does it tell?

Dan Hodge: It’s a story about people who desperately need to love and be loved, and yet seem incapable of being honest and present for each other. I’m reluctant to give the game away in terms of what made it so scandalous in its early days, but let’s say that it’s a subject that we are still grappling with daily. This much is true – at first glance the captive of the title seems to be Irene. She is the daughter of a domineering diplomat who carries a dark secret that could ruin her life as she knows it. But as the play unfolds, each character emerges as a prisoner to another. It’s pretty thrilling.

FringeArts: What brought you to Physick House? 

Dan Hodge: We have a history of performing our Fringe pieces in historic locations in Philadelphia. Because The Captive is essentially a drawing room drama, we knew that we wanted a historic home. The Physick was a perfect fit for this show. It has a sense of class balanced well with an odd severity. Because the rooms are small, the audience will be right on top of the play, heightening the “fly on the wall” experience. The play is full of secrets and heated private moments, so the dangerous intimacy that a location like the Physick affords is ideal. This kind of immersive theatrical experience leaves both the actors and the audience with nowhere to hide.

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Tonight: Neighborhood Fringe Scratch Night Spotlight Part 2

Posted August 11th, 2014

Every Monday night in August, we’re offering free previews of the 2014 Fringe Festival–Neighborhood Fringe artists are serving up short excerpts of their work, and we’re serving up free beer. Tonight is round two:

Get a taste of Susan Chase’s Susan’s Undoing:

RealLivePeople‘s humanism will be on display with Would I lie to you?

DC Theatre Scene called the acting of RHolt Productions’s Sisters of Ellery Hollow by DC playwright Stephen Spotswood “exceptional” when it was in DC Fringe a couple years ago; actor Rachel Hold will reprise her role in the Neighborhood Fringe edition.

Philadelphia Artists’ Collective offer’s a one-man-performance take on Shakespeare’s poem The Rape of Lucrece.

And New Street Dance Group’s Another Word for Missing will be there too. Catch them in rehearsal:


Free! RSVP here.
FringeArts
140 N. Columbus Blvd
Philadelphia, PA 19106
August 11 at 7 pm

–Nicholas Gilewicz