hpfs splash hydrant
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HPFS Splash: Never Change, Philly

Posted April 16th, 2019

Continuing our HPFS Splash blog series, we’ll be taking the tops off the metaphorical fire hydrants* and spilling out the information you want to know from our High Pressure Fire Service (HPFS) artists about their HPFS shows, local inspirations, and living in Philly.

Today’s big question: What do you hope never changes about Philadelphia?

Jess Conda as bartender at Fergie’s Pub

“Fergie’s Pub. The place has kept its welcoming, rock and roll authenticity through all of the gentrification in Center City. The Fergie’s attitude IS Philadelphia. It was here before Craft Beer was cool and it ain’t going anywhere. Hell, the place had an entire 26 story condo literally built around it and stayed open the whole time. Now THAT’s True Grit. It’s also where I cut my teeth as a bartender and have had the most one on one conversations with the widest range of people in the city. A bar is a tiny stage, and while I was coming up and waiting to get more work as an actor, I was learning about real life working there…[I don’t want] anymore diner closings. We’ve lost too many already. The day the Melrose or Broad Street Diner closes, that’s it, I’m outta here.
–Jess Conda, A Hard Time

“Rittenhouse Square and Christ Church. And walks along the river in several places, West side, East side and along 24th street and the bridges that are lit at night. And the Rowing Houses on Kelly Drive that are lit at night. And the sculpture gardens.”
–Marcia Saunders, A Fierce Kind of Love

Image result for chop shop south street“That old men in South Philly will continue to use the sewer drains as their trashcans. That the wheely gangs will continue to wheely their bikes against traffic down Broad Street. And The Chop Shop on South Street. No one works there for longer than a day and you’ve never had a worse haircut for under $20. Just kidding. If you go, go to Kate or Ruki.”
–The Berserker Residents, Broccoli, Roosevelt and Mr. House!

Folks are a little rude, the food is awesome, and the arts are appreciated. I like that the Ave of the Arts gets mobbed by sports fans celebrating/rioting on occasion. Also, Broad Street moves through a lot of different neighborhoods and reflects that.
–Alex Torra, The Sincerity Project #3 (2019)

The only constant is change. And litter.”
–Alice Yorke, The Appointment

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Arch Street UMC Church

The lone heroes, elders doing community work, people organizing voters and doing street cleanup, really make Philly for me, these people who are dedicated to their communities no matter what changes come because Philly has changed so much since I’ve been here, especially around housing.
–Camae Ayewa, Circuit City

“My church, Arch Street UMC is deeply involved in this city’s social and economic concerns with a focus on justice for those without shelter, the LBGTQ+ Community, Refugees/Immigrants, Education, higher wages for low income jobs and so much more. My involvement with Arch Street gives me a great sense of responsibility for those who are unjustly treated and the ability to feel as though I am making a difference.”
–Cathy Simpson, A Fierce Kind of Love

Read last week’s HPFS Splash: Gritty Edition, and thanks for joining us for the final installment of HPFS Splash!

hpfs splash hydrant*High Pressure Fire Service (HPFS) takes its name from FringeArts’ historic building, the first high pressure pump house in the country. Opened in 1903, the station pumped water from the Delaware River to fire hydrants across Philadelphia, connecting the city and helping it grow and thrive. This history of creativity and connectivity is at the very heart of the High Pressure Fire Service festival. You can see the old HPFS fire hydrants across the city between the Delaware and the Schuylkill Rivers and between South Street to Girard Avenue. You may even see them of them sporting a fancy new HPFS sticker. Tag us on Instagram @fringearts if you see one!

Click here to learn more about all of our High Pressure Fire Service shows.

 

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