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Posts Tagged ‘Urban Movement Arts’

You Are Not a Shining Star

Posted September 7th, 2019

September 7, 8, 21 + 22, 2019

Have you ever thought about your legacy? I mean, what makes you SPECIAL? What does it mean to be YOU? Are you the experiences you’ve accumulated? Are you the thoughts in your brain? If you’ve never pondered this, don’t worry. We’re here to help. Shining Star is a movement-based performance that is weird but not boring. This work supports and is supported by Urban Movement Arts (UMA), where we both work and teach. Come dance with us! UMA welcomes adults of all ages and experience levels.

$15 / 60 minutes


Performed by Vince Johnson and Mark Wong Designed by Mark Wong Outside eye by Lily Kind Supported by UMA

Learn More:
urbanmovementarts.com
Instagram (UMA)
Instagram (hiphopfundamentals)

 

 

Solo Dance for People Who Don’t Like Solo Dance: Metal & Kind’s Indestructible Flowers

Posted August 29th, 2018

This Fringe, two instructors at Philly’s dance studio Urban Movement Arts (UMA) combine their talents in a collage of new solo work designed for folks secretly underwhelmed by new solo work. Coming from diverse dance backgrounds, Lily Kind and Mark “Metal” Wong showcase multidisciplinary work grounded in social and folk dance and “a kind of analytic optimism”.

Lily Kind. Photo by Katrina D’Autrement

Metal & Kind talked to FringeArts about Indestructible Flowers, the pitfalls of solo dance, and the role of UMA in Philadelphia’s dance and hip-hop scenes.

FringeArts: What common pitfalls do you see in solo dance work?

Mark “Metal” Wong: It’s really easy to get pretentious when you’re the only one up there. I’m trying my best not to be. But by nature, I think that all solo work is a little self-indulgent, so I try to embrace that and have fun with it to an extent as well.

Lily Kind: I agree with Mark. And I prefer a more vaudevillian theater tradition, where the audience is in more of a dialogue with the performer. By contrast, the traditional concert theater agreement is very safe for both performer and audience, and I think that can make for pretty boring solo work, where the artist has already surrendered any experimental elements by being inside a historically aristocratic construct.

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