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manger

Posted September 23rd, 2018
DescriptionAbout the ArtistsAbout Philadelphia Museum of DanceInterviewFurther Reading

“Boris Charmatz plants humanity in its base instincts.” Télérama (France)

“We launch movement with our mouths … Dance is in the stomach. Dance is in the palate. Dance is in the teeth … We envision a sort of meal in motion, we eat everything, we eat anything, all the time. We are an orchestra in motion, self-fueled … The essence is jammed down the throat. You don’t want to die stuffed. You swallow the message without having read it. You swallow reality. You digest conflicts.” Boris Charmatz

Whet your appetite with manger, a delectable work by French choreographer Boris Charmatz  (Levée des conflits, 2016 Fringe Festival) that implores audiences to examine the nature of eating, of digesting information, of consuming.

Charmatz subjects dance to formal constraints which redefine its possibilities. In manger (French for “to eat”), he sets bodies in motion not with the eyes, or with the limbs, but with the mouth: dancers chew through reams of paper, taste, swallow, sing, eat. The mouth is a crossroads where food, voices, breath, words, and saliva intermix: it is a locus where the inside and the outside, the self and the other meet, taste each other, engage each other, interchange and ingest each other. manger is a swallowed reality, a slow digestion of the world.

$35 general / $24 member
$15 student + 25-and-under
$2 FringeAccess member
  

Directed by Boris Charmatz Lights Yves Godin Sound Olivier Renouf Arrangements and vocal training Dalila Khatir Choreographic assistant Thierry Micouin Interpreted by Or Avishay, Matthieu Barbin, Nuno Bizarro, Ashley Chen, Olga Dukhovnaya, Alix Eynaudi, Julien Gallée-Ferré, Christophe Ives, Maud Le Pladec, Filipe Lourenço, Asha Imani Thomas, Frank Willens Sound material “Ticket Man,” The Kills; “Hey Light,” Animal Collective; “King Kong,” Daniel Johnston; “Leisureforce,” Aesop Rock; “Je t’obéis,” Sexy Sushi; “La Folia,” Arcangelo Corelli; Symphony n°7, Ludwig van Beethoven; “Qui habitat,” Josquin des Prez; “Three Voices,” Morton Feldman; “Lux Aeterna,” György Ligeti Text Le bonhomme de merde in L’Enregistré, Christophe Tarkos, P.OL., 2014

Photos: (featured) ®Beniamin Boar (other photos) Ursula Kaufmann

manger is a part of Philadelphia Museum of Dance (see below for more information). Support for Philadelphia Museum of Dance has been provided to Westphal College of Media Arts & Design by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

manger is produced by Musée de la danse / Centre chorégraphique national de Rennes et de Bretagne—Directed by Boris Charmatz. The association receives grants from the Ministry of Culture and Communication (Regional Direction of Cultural Affairs / Brittany), the City of Rennes, the Regional Council of Brittany and Ille-et-Vilaine General Council. museedeladanse.orgThe Institut français regularly supports the international touring of Musée de la danse.

Coproduced by Ruhrtriennale-International Festival of the Arts ; Théâtre National de Bretagne-Rennes; Théâtre de la Ville and Festival d’Automne Paris; steirischer herbst Graz; Holland Festival Amsterdam; Kunstenfestivaldesarts Brussels, Künstlerhaus Mousonturm Frankfurt am Main

Created at the Ruhrtriennale — International Festival of the Arts 2014


About Boris Charmatz

Boris Charmatz is director of the Musée de la danse in Rennes, France, and co-curator of the Philadelphia Museum of Dance.

Charmatz has presented a series of highly memorable pieces, from Aatt enen tionon(1996) to 10000 gestures (2017). While maintaining an extensive touring schedule, he also participates in improvisational events on a regular basis with Saul Williams, Archie Shepp, and Médéric Collignon and continues to work as a performer with Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker and Tino Sehgal.

As associate artist of the 2011 Festival d’Avignon, Charmatz presented enfant, a piece for 26 children and 9 dancers in the Cour d’Honneur of the Pope’s Palace. In 2013, he was invited to MoMA, New York, where he conceived Musée de la danse: Three Collective Gestures, a three week dance program in the Marron Atrium and all over the museum. In 2015, Charmatz was invited to Tate Modern, London for If Tate Modern was Musée de la danse?, an intensive two day performance program throughout the galleries and the Turbine Hall.

From 2002-2004, while an artist-in-residence at the Centre National de la Danse, he developed Bocal, a nomadic and ephemeral school that brought together students from different backgrounds. In 2007 and 2008, he was a visiting professor at Berlin’s Universität der Künste, where he contributed to the creation of a new dance curriculum.

In 2016, he was invited to Philadelphia for Westphal College’s Dancing Dialogues residency, which featured the acclaimed Levée des conflits for 24 dancers, part of the 2016 Fringe Festival. He choreographed manger, which will be presented as part of the 2018 Fringe Festival, and danse de nuit, which will be the final performance of the Philadelphia Museum of Dance daylong dance exhibit at the Barnes Foundation on October 6, 2018.

Since 2009, he has been the director of the Rennes and Brittany National Choreographic Centre (France), and has transformed it into a Museum of Dance (Musée de la danse) of a new kind. The museum has initiated, among others, the projects: préfiguration, expo zéro, rebutoh, brouillon (rough draft), 20 Dancers for the XX Century, Fous de danse (Mad about dance), and Petit Musée de la danse.

Charmatz co-authored the books undertraining / On A Contemporary Dance with Isabelle Launay, Emails 2009-2010 with Jérôme Bel, and wrote “Je suis une école,” related to the project Bocal. More information is available at museedeladanse.org and borischarmatz.org.


Philadelphia Museum of Dance

Philadelphia Museum of Dance explores the tension between public and private experience and seeks to offer alternate possibilities for exhibiting dance performance, including the idea of public choreographic assembly, a signature concept for Boris Charmatz. Support for Philadelphia Museum of Dance has been provided to Westphal College of Media Arts & Design by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

This project culminates in a one-day free exhibit of live dance at the Barnes Foundation on Saturday, October 6, 3-9 pm. See the Barnes come alive with dance in nearly every corner. Wake up your body and mind by joining a group warm-up with Boris Charmatz. Wade through the Solo Forest, a collection of simultaneous solos. Feast on dance on film. Power up at a food truck. Join the soul train. End the evening with danse de nuit – a work by Charmatz that radically rethinks public assembly.

Stop by for an hour or stay for six. Visit drexel.edu/phlpmd to plan your day.


Interview with Boris Charmatz

Conducted by Gilles Amalvi, 2013

Amalvi: An important starting idea for you was the “not very spectacular” dimension of the action of eating, swallowing. Is this line of thought still relevant?

Charmatz: Absolutely. The creation, as I now see it, increasingly tends towards a form of disappearance: treating food in terms of swallowing it, blotting it out. But then, this calls for careful, precise planning, very unlike the rather raw principle that I had initially envisaged. To tackle the dimension of disappearance, the dimension of blockage, of impediment — in speaking, dancing — I find some subtle, precise mechanisms, bordering on invisibility in order not to just dangle in front of the audience a vision of bodies in the process of ingesting.

Amalvi: You evoke your earlier pieces Levée des conflits and enfant in manger. Do you intend connections with principles derived in earlier pieces?

Charmatz: Indeed. This piece is not a synthesis, nor the conclusion to a trilogy, but I think that those pieces contain principles corresponding to two types of desire, to two ways of constructing dance, that find a way to intermingle in manger.

It also feels the influence of another previous piece. I focus on the question of what a choreography of mouths, of hands, and of feet, might be, in the sense that the stage is a sort of a “table.” Strangely enough, as I was working with this material, images from an older piece, Herses, came back to me. Herses contains a lot of gestures that are quite “unrestrained,” involving a play between presence and absence. In the end, eating is an extremely concrete action, but perhaps those who perform it are only partly there, they’re not fully conscious of the act. There is nothing demonstrative in our way of eating, rather a form of half-absence, ghostly in character. Perhaps this is due to the fact of being divided between two actions: we are half-eating and half-dancing.

There are few moments in the performance when there is only one thing visible on the stage. Very quickly, other things appear, adopting the matrix of a duo from Herses, except while eating —the idea is that you can do anything you want, as long as you do it while eating.

Amalvi: Did you discuss with the dancers the ideas of eating off the ground, of exchanging food, of how food touches upon our taboos.

Charmatz: Quite right, we have talked about it. There are dancers who are not going to take part in this piece for that very reason. This raises issues of hygiene, of diet, of a balanced diet, of sharing… Can eight people bite into the same apple? Eat off the ground? These are questions of culture and individual choice.

Amalvi: If you think about it from the strict point of view of dance, food is an obstacle: it encumbers your hands, then, when you’re digesting, it encumbers your body. I have the impression that you feel the need to impose a constraint, an obstacle as the driving force of choreography. A way of “blocking” what is easy, obvious about dance.

Charmatz: Yes, it’s true. For me, the whole question resides in knowing what parallel effect this creates. Food as an obstacle has no meaning unless it makes possible or generates another thing. For example: dancing with a child in your arms is a hindrance, but it generates movements that would not have been otherwise possible.

In dance, few things happen through the mouth — it is mainly used to breathe. More often than not, you try to keep it closed, out of an “aesthetic” convention. Without going into the impersonal “masks” in modern dance or the grimaces in German expressionist dance, it can be said that the mouth is rarely the point of departure for movement. The choreography of this whole piece is tied to the mouth; it comes together in a relation of distance and proximity with the mouth. Just as Levée de conflits begins by the gesture of scrubbing the floor in a circular manner, this piece arises out of the relation between the hand, food and the mouth. This is the matrix that engenders other ways of eating — and dancing.


Further Reading

Boris Charmatz’s ‘manger’: A discussion of dance in public space by Lynne Lancaster, Dance Informa

Excerpt:
Charmatz expressed that he is concerned that public spaces have almost disappeared as a place for performance. He is looking for new ideas for movement… He asked the question, “How can dance be present in visual arts?”

Read the full article

Watch a video of manger here.

manger

Posted September 22nd, 2018
DescriptionAbout the ArtistsAbout Philadelphia Museum of DanceInterviewFurther Reading

“Boris Charmatz plants humanity in its base instincts.” Télérama (France)

“We launch movement with our mouths … Dance is in the stomach. Dance is in the palate. Dance is in the teeth … We envision a sort of meal in motion, we eat everything, we eat anything, all the time. We are an orchestra in motion, self-fueled … The essence is jammed down the throat. You don’t want to die stuffed. You swallow the message without having read it. You swallow reality. You digest conflicts.” Boris Charmatz

Whet your appetite with manger, a delectable work by French choreographer Boris Charmatz  (Levée des conflits, 2016 Fringe Festival) that implores audiences to examine the nature of eating, of digesting information, of consuming.

Charmatz subjects dance to formal constraints which redefine its possibilities. In manger (French for “to eat”), he sets bodies in motion not with the eyes, or with the limbs, but with the mouth: dancers chew through reams of paper, taste, swallow, sing, eat. The mouth is a crossroads where food, voices, breath, words, and saliva intermix: it is a locus where the inside and the outside, the self and the other meet, taste each other, engage each other, interchange and ingest each other. manger is a swallowed reality, a slow digestion of the world.

$35 general / $24 member
$15 student + 25-and-under
$2 FringeAccess member  

Directed by Boris Charmatz Lights Yves Godin Sound Olivier Renouf Arrangements and vocal training Dalila Khatir Choreographic assistant Thierry Micouin Interpreted by Or Avishay, Matthieu Barbin, Nuno Bizarro, Ashley Chen, Olga Dukhovnaya, Alix Eynaudi, Julien Gallée-Ferré, Christophe Ives, Maud Le Pladec, Filipe Lourenço, Asha Imani Thomas, Frank Willens Sound material “Ticket Man,” The Kills; “Hey Light,” Animal Collective; “King Kong,” Daniel Johnston; “Leisureforce,” Aesop Rock; “Je t’obéis,” Sexy Sushi; “La Folia,” Arcangelo Corelli; Symphony n°7, Ludwig van Beethoven; “Qui habitat,” Josquin des Prez; “Three Voices,” Morton Feldman; “Lux Aeterna,” György Ligeti Text Le bonhomme de merde in L’Enregistré, Christophe Tarkos, P.OL., 2014

Photos: (featured) ®Beniamin Boar (other photos) Ursula Kaufmann

manger is a part of Philadelphia Museum of Dance (see below for more information). Support for Philadelphia Museum of Dance has been provided to Westphal College of Media Arts & Design by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

manger is produced by Musée de la danse / Centre chorégraphique national de Rennes et de Bretagne—Directed by Boris Charmatz. The association receives grants from the Ministry of Culture and Communication (Regional Direction of Cultural Affairs / Brittany), the City of Rennes, the Regional Council of Brittany and Ille-et-Vilaine General Council. museedeladanse.orgThe Institut français regularly supports the international touring of Musée de la danse.

Coproduced by Ruhrtriennale-International Festival of the Arts ; Théâtre National de Bretagne-Rennes; Théâtre de la Ville and Festival d’Automne Paris; steirischer herbst Graz; Holland Festival Amsterdam; Kunstenfestivaldesarts Brussels, Künstlerhaus Mousonturm Frankfurt am Main

Created at the Ruhrtriennale — International Festival of the Arts 2014


About Boris Charmatz

Boris Charmatz is director of the Musée de la danse in Rennes, France, and co-curator of the Philadelphia Museum of Dance.

Charmatz has presented a series of highly memorable pieces, from Aatt enen tionon(1996) to 10000 gestures (2017). While maintaining an extensive touring schedule, he also participates in improvisational events on a regular basis with Saul Williams, Archie Shepp, and Médéric Collignon and continues to work as a performer with Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker and Tino Sehgal.

As associate artist of the 2011 Festival d’Avignon, Charmatz presented enfant, a piece for 26 children and 9 dancers in the Cour d’Honneur of the Pope’s Palace. In 2013, he was invited to MoMA, New York, where he conceived Musée de la danse: Three Collective Gestures, a three week dance program in the Marron Atrium and all over the museum. In 2015, Charmatz was invited to Tate Modern, London for If Tate Modern was Musée de la danse?, an intensive two day performance program throughout the galleries and the Turbine Hall.

From 2002-2004, while an artist-in-residence at the Centre National de la Danse, he developed Bocal, a nomadic and ephemeral school that brought together students from different backgrounds. In 2007 and 2008, he was a visiting professor at Berlin’s Universität der Künste, where he contributed to the creation of a new dance curriculum.

In 2016, he was invited to Philadelphia for Westphal College’s Dancing Dialogues residency, which featured the acclaimed Levée des conflits for 24 dancers, part of the 2016 Fringe Festival. He choreographed manger, which will be presented as part of the 2018 Fringe Festival, and danse de nuit, which will be the final performance of the Philadelphia Museum of Dance daylong dance exhibit at the Barnes Foundation on October 6, 2018.

Since 2009, he has been the director of the Rennes and Brittany National Choreographic Centre (France), and has transformed it into a Museum of Dance (Musée de la danse) of a new kind. The museum has initiated, among others, the projects: préfiguration, expo zéro, rebutoh, brouillon (rough draft), 20 Dancers for the XX Century, Fous de danse (Mad about dance), and Petit Musée de la danse.

Charmatz co-authored the books undertraining / On A Contemporary Dance with Isabelle Launay, Emails 2009-2010 with Jérôme Bel, and wrote “Je suis une école,” related to the project Bocal. More information is available at museedeladanse.org and borischarmatz.org.


Philadelphia Museum of Dance

Philadelphia Museum of Dance explores the tension between public and private experience and seeks to offer alternate possibilities for exhibiting dance performance, including the idea of public choreographic assembly, a signature concept for Boris Charmatz. Support for Philadelphia Museum of Dance has been provided to Westphal College of Media Arts & Design by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

This project culminates in a one-day free exhibit of live dance at the Barnes Foundation on Saturday, October 6, 3-9 pm. See the Barnes come alive with dance in nearly every corner. Wake up your body and mind by joining a group warm-up with Boris Charmatz. Wade through the Solo Forest, a collection of simultaneous solos. Feast on dance on film. Power up at a food truck. Join the soul train. End the evening with danse de nuit – a work by Charmatz that radically rethinks public assembly.

Stop by for an hour or stay for six. Visit drexel.edu/phlpmd to plan your day.


Interview with Boris Charmatz

Conducted by Gilles Amalvi, 2013

Amalvi: An important starting idea for you was the “not very spectacular” dimension of the action of eating, swallowing. Is this line of thought still relevant?

Charmatz: Absolutely. The creation, as I now see it, increasingly tends towards a form of disappearance: treating food in terms of swallowing it, blotting it out. But then, this calls for careful, precise planning, very unlike the rather raw principle that I had initially envisaged. To tackle the dimension of disappearance, the dimension of blockage, of impediment — in speaking, dancing — I find some subtle, precise mechanisms, bordering on invisibility in order not to just dangle in front of the audience a vision of bodies in the process of ingesting.

Amalvi: You evoke your earlier pieces Levée des conflits and enfant in manger. Do you intend connections with principles derived in earlier pieces?

Charmatz: Indeed. This piece is not a synthesis, nor the conclusion to a trilogy, but I think that those pieces contain principles corresponding to two types of desire, to two ways of constructing dance, that find a way to intermingle in manger.

It also feels the influence of another previous piece. I focus on the question of what a choreography of mouths, of hands, and of feet, might be, in the sense that the stage is a sort of a “table.” Strangely enough, as I was working with this material, images from an older piece, Herses, came back to me. Herses contains a lot of gestures that are quite “unrestrained,” involving a play between presence and absence. In the end, eating is an extremely concrete action, but perhaps those who perform it are only partly there, they’re not fully conscious of the act. There is nothing demonstrative in our way of eating, rather a form of half-absence, ghostly in character. Perhaps this is due to the fact of being divided between two actions: we are half-eating and half-dancing.

There are few moments in the performance when there is only one thing visible on the stage. Very quickly, other things appear, adopting the matrix of a duo from Herses, except while eating —the idea is that you can do anything you want, as long as you do it while eating.

Amalvi: Did you discuss with the dancers the ideas of eating off the ground, of exchanging food, of how food touches upon our taboos.

Charmatz: Quite right, we have talked about it. There are dancers who are not going to take part in this piece for that very reason. This raises issues of hygiene, of diet, of a balanced diet, of sharing… Can eight people bite into the same apple? Eat off the ground? These are questions of culture and individual choice.

Amalvi: If you think about it from the strict point of view of dance, food is an obstacle: it encumbers your hands, then, when you’re digesting, it encumbers your body. I have the impression that you feel the need to impose a constraint, an obstacle as the driving force of choreography. A way of “blocking” what is easy, obvious about dance.

Charmatz: Yes, it’s true. For me, the whole question resides in knowing what parallel effect this creates. Food as an obstacle has no meaning unless it makes possible or generates another thing. For example: dancing with a child in your arms is a hindrance, but it generates movements that would not have been otherwise possible.

In dance, few things happen through the mouth — it is mainly used to breathe. More often than not, you try to keep it closed, out of an “aesthetic” convention. Without going into the impersonal “masks” in modern dance or the grimaces in German expressionist dance, it can be said that the mouth is rarely the point of departure for movement. The choreography of this whole piece is tied to the mouth; it comes together in a relation of distance and proximity with the mouth. Just as Levée de conflits begins by the gesture of scrubbing the floor in a circular manner, this piece arises out of the relation between the hand, food and the mouth. This is the matrix that engenders other ways of eating — and dancing.


Further Reading

Boris Charmatz’s ‘manger’: A discussion of dance in public space by Lynne Lancaster, Dance Informa

Excerpt:
Charmatz expressed that he is concerned that public spaces have almost disappeared as a place for performance. He is looking for new ideas for movement… He asked the question, “How can dance be present in visual arts?”

Read the full article

Watch a video of manger here.

Fringe Picks for Closing Weekend

Posted September 20th, 2018

Be not troubled, for all things must pass but the end has not yet come. We’ve all had a great Fringe so far and the fun continues. Though many shows have already concluded, some are just beginning.

Here’s so picks for what to see on the Fringe’s final weekend!

manger
Boris Charmatz
Whet your appetite with manger, a delectable work by French choreographer Boris Charmatz (Levée des conflits, 2016 Fringe Festival) that implores audiences to examine the nature of eating, of digesting information, of consuming. In manger (French for “to eat”), he sets bodies in motion not with the eyes, or with the limbs, but with the mouth.
Presented in partnership with Westphal College of Media Arts & Design as part of Philadelphia Museum of Dance.
September 22 + 23 at 8pm
More info + tickets

in plain airIn Plain Air
International Contemporary Ensemble
A 3,000-pipe organ, centuries-old bells as they are heard in the belfry, an orchestra of pipe whistles, community-built music boxes: the sounds of In Plain Air carry the audience through the campus and history of one of the nation’s most historic sites.
Presented in partnership with Christ Church Preservation Trust
September 22 at 1pm, 3:30pm + 6pm
September 23 at 3:30pm + 6pm
More info + tickets

ear whisperedear-whispered: works by Tania El Khoury
Tania El Khoury
Working between Lebanon and the United Kingdom, Tania El Khoury meticulously crafts innovative performances and installations that engage the audience in multi-sensory interaction. Unlike more conventional theater and performance, El Khoury’s live art work comes alive through the audience’s interaction with it. An extensive survey of El Khoury’s art, ear-whispered: works by Tania El Khoury presents five pieces at locations in Old City and at Bryn Mawr College, all of which have performances or gallery hours this weekend.
Presented in partnership with Bryn Mawr College
More info + tickets

Company
EgoPo Classic Theater
Bring your blanket and pillow for a Beckett slumber party. EgoPo remounts their 2009 Fringe hit, which sold out in five cities. An immersive sensory experience, you are blindfolded on your back in the dark, the haunting text whispered in your ear. Free cookies and milk.
September 20 +21 at 7pm + 9pm
September 22 at 3pm, 5pm + 8pm
September 23 at 3pm + 5pm
More info + tickets

Circadium Presents: Autopilot & Galactic Garden Party
Circadium
Double bill: Autopilot is a circus-based examination of how life’s instructions are given, taught, or learned, and how we navigate life with and without those instructions. Galactic Garden Party utilizes juggling, dance, scientific lectures, and theater to show the wonders of Earth, and what lies beyond the atmosphere in the cosmos.
September 21-23 at 8pm
More info + tickets

a PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION (of the EFFECTS of KINESTHETIC OCULAR NEURO-PSYCHOLOGY and its POTENTIAL as an AID in the DISCOVERY of SELF)
Fred Brown / Philly Improv Theater
Your eyes are your window to the world. They are also the world’s window to you. Enter a world of seeing your own mind, as Dr. Rhampon Stietger—using music to keep time—introduces kinesthetic neuropsychology as a tool to unlock deeply imprinted images, feelings, associations, and fantasies.
September 20 + 21 at 7pm
September 22 at 3:30pm + 7pm
More info + tickets

Pillow Talk
The Footlights International Tour Show, Pillow Talk brings together the brightest stars of student comedy, whose assembled forces deliver fresh, witty and downright funny sketches, monologues and songs. You can expect free-flowing hilarity, excellent original writing and side-splitting character comedy, so don’t miss your chance to see this inventive new offering from the group that launched many comedy greats, including Stephen Fry, Sue Perkins, David Mitchell, Richard Ayoade and Mel Giedroyc.
September 20 +21 at 8pm
More info + tickets

Heightened Sight
Heighten your senses with Leslie Elkins of foursome performance and Tap Team Two. Leslie Elkins of foursome performance will accentuate transitional spaces in Embracing the Liminal. Tap Team Two utilizes Hoofing, the original style of tap dance, as a means to educate audiences on the history of tap. Hoofing is an American art form that evolved from the roots of Irish clogging, African dance, and street and social dances of the early 20th century. Tap Team Two will showcase vibrant sounds in Cadence of Color. Get ready to feel provocative images, see in-between states, and hear color spectra.
September 22 at 4pm + 7pm
More info + tickets

Paprika Plains Natalie Fletcher / Jessica Noel
Sisters Natalie Fletcher and Jessica Noel will take you back in time to tell a story of love, loss, and bargaining with the universe inspired by Joni Mitchell’s 1977 album Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter. Told through live body painting and dance-theater, with lighting design by John Noel and music by Joni Mitchell. Philly PACK is an artistic home for dance- and theater-loving children and adults, located in South Philadelphia. Philly PACK is proud to welcome visiting artist Natalie Fletcher. Natalie is a Portland-based body-painter who won Skin Wars season 1.
September 21+22 at 8pm
More info + tickets

Darlings Kill Us Please
Good Good Comedy Theatre
The first Fringe production from Good Good Comedy Theatre, Philadelphia’s home for mercilessly unpredictable independent comedy. Darlings: Kill Us Please guts the innards of a full year’s worth of shows from Darlings, Good Good Comedy Theatre’s monthly, fast-paced comedy shit show featuring brand new bits, live music and special guests, and leaves in only the juiciest bits and chunks.
September 20 at 8pm
September 21 at 8pm, 10pm + midnight
September 22 at 2pm, 8pm + 10pm
More info + tickets

Metal & Kind’s Indestructible Flowers
Lily Kind and Mark “Metal” Wong
Metal is unexpectedly soft. Kind is unabashedly sharp. Together, they present a collage of new solo work designed for folks secretly underwhelmed by new solo work. Metal and Kind are both multidisciplinary powerhouses working in and around social and folk dance, devised dance theater, and experimental storytelling.
September 22 + 23 at 7pm
More info + tickets

Shelter
Drip Symphony
Shelter is the story of a group of artists living together in an abandoned theater, brought together by a shared sense of artistic integrity. It follows their lives as they create prolifically while their dreams and delusions grow wild inside their home. The show explores the value of art, the nature of creation, and the power of physical boundaries to shape our realities. Presented by Drip Symphony and Plays & Players, Shelter uses an immersive design where the entire theater is transformed into performance space, and the audience, seated on stage and scattered throughout the house, lives among the action.
September 20-22 at 8pm
More info + tickets

Curious: Think Outside the Pipeline (Music for Children and Other Curious People in the Fringe Guide)
Ants on a Log
Curious: Think Outside the Pipeline tells the musical story of Clio and her sibling Taylor as they strive to organize their town. With the help of a songful community, a dancing pencil, and you, dear audience, they strive for big change, even in the face of some bigger, more powerful people.
September 22 at 11am
More info + tickets

A New Kind of Whole
Paige Zubel & Eleanor Sofer
Written by Paige Zubel and directed by Claris Park, A New Kind of Whole is a surrealistic exploration of identity through sexuality and the relationship between the mind and the body. As Lea navigates the line between what is real and what is a projection of her deteriorating mental health, reality distorts and blurs.
September 20 at 7pm
September 21 at 8pm
September 22 at 3pm
More info + tickets

Tango, Tarantella and Tutus
The Rock School for Dance Education
Exciting, energetic young talent from around the world perform classical and contemporary vignettes that will keep you on the edge of your seat! Alumni from The Rock School go on to join the most prestigious dance companies worldwide. See the dance stars of tomorrow, today!
September 22 at 1:30pm
More info + tickets

International Fringe 2018: A Welcome to Artists from Around the World

Posted September 2nd, 2018

The United States government may be pursuing an isolationist policy but the Philadelphia Fringe is doing the opposite: opening its doors not only to the most creative American performers and performances but also to the best and most creative theater artists and their productions from around the world—overcoming the ancient fear of the symbolic Tower of Babel with people not understanding each other.

To show the worldwide scope of the 22nd Philadelphia Fringe Festival, we offer this spotlight on performers from abroad and productions by American artists that present a global perspective.

Theater writer Henrik Eger, editor of Drama Around the Globe and contributor to Phindie and Broad Street Review, among other publications, has lived in six countries on three continents and has visited Africa and Australia as well. He bids everyone a hearty WELCOME to the City of Brotherly Love—this year in 18 different languages: Arabic, Celtic, Chinese, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Irish, Italian, Latin, Polish, Romanian, and Spanish.

We start this year’s overview with a special welcome to two programs featuring a wide range of global creators:

INTERNATIONAL CREATIVES

  1. le super grandBienvenue & welcome to Montreal-based choreographer Sylvain Émard and Le Super Grand ContinentalLe Grand Continental wowed audiences during its run at the 2012 Fringe Festival and has garnered enthusiastic response across the world. Fully realizing a blissful marriage between the pure delight of line dancing and the fluidity and expressiveness of contemporary dance, the celebratory event enlists hundreds of local people to perform its synchronized choreography in large-scale public performances. The world’s most infectious performance event returns to the front steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in an even larger spectacle of dance.

More info and tickets here

  1. Bonvenon, willkommen, bienvenido, witamy, bienvenue & welcome to Do You Want A Cookie? from The Bearded Ladies Cabaret—a world premiere with an international cast. Do You Want A Cookie? serves up a delicious romp through cabaret history, with an international cast of artists performing a live revue of cabaret from the Chat Noir to Weimar nightlife to 21st-century drag. The all-star cast comes draws from around the world, including Bridge Markland (Berlin), Malgorzata Kasprzycka (Paris/Warsaw), Dieter Rita Scholl (Berlin), and Tareke Ortiz (Mexico City).

More info and tickets here

REFUGEES and EXILES

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    As Far As My Fingertips Take Me. Photo by

    وسهلا اهلا (ahlaan wasahlan) & bienvenu. Welcome to Tania El Khoury who lives in Lebanon and the UK with her multifaceted program ear-whispered. Little is known about Palestinian refugee camps and their communities. El Khoury presents her Fringe work in five parts through interactive performances and installations at Bryn Mawr College:

    1. Gardens Speak, an interactive sound installation containing the oral histories of ten ordinary people who were buried in Syrian gardens. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.
    2. Camp Pause, a video installation that tells the stories of four residents of the Rashidieh Refugee Camp on the coast of Lebanon. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.
    3. As Far As My Fingertips Take Me, an encounter through a gallery wall between a single audience member and a refugee. (Old City & Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.  
    4. Stories of Refuge, an immersive video installation that invites audiences to lay down on metal bunk beds and watch videos shot by Syrian asylum seekers in Munich, Germany. (Old City.) Read more.
    5. Tell Me What I Can Do, a newly commissioned work featuring letters that audiences have written in response to Gardens Speak. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.

More info and tickets here

  1. Bienvenido & welcome to the bilingual (Spanish & English) cast of La Fábrica performing Gustave Ott’s Passport. Lost in a foreign country, Eugenia is detained and thrown into a vicious maelstrom of miscommunication. This poetic and immersive Kafkaesque thriller delves into the question of immigration—exposing the mechanics of language and power. Some performances will be presented in English, some in Spanish, and some will be decided at the toss of a coin.

More info and tickets here

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Something to Chew On: Boris Charmatz on manger

Posted August 20th, 2018

Boris Charmatz subjects dance to formal constraints which redefine the field of its possibilities: a potentially infinite canon of gestures in his 2016 Fringe Festival piece Levée des conflits, inert bodies of children, animated by adult dancers in enfant. The stage is a notepad where he jots down ideas and organic concepts in order to observe the chemical reactions, the intensities, and the tensions engendered in their encounter. In manger, the center of gravity was subject to displacement: how to set bodies in motion not with the eyes, or with the limbs, but with the mouth? Gilles Amalvi talked to Boris Charmatz in 2013 about the ideas behind this delectable contemporary work.

Featured in the 2018 Fringe Festival, manger is presented in partnership with Westphal College of Media Arts & Design as part of Philadelphia Museum of Dance.

Gilles Amalvi: An important starting idea for you was the “not very spectacular” dimension of the action of eating, swallowing. Is this line of thought still relevant?

Boris Charmatz: Absolutely. The creation, as I now see it, increasingly tends towards a form of disappearance: treating food in terms of swallowing it, blotting it out. But then, this calls for careful, precise planning, very unlike the rather raw principle that I had initially envisaged. To tackle the dimension of disappearance, the dimension of blockage, of impediment—in speaking, dancing—I find some subtle, precise mechanisms, bordering on invisibility in order not to just dangle in front of the audience a vision of bodies in the process of ingesting.

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