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Posts Tagged ‘Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’

Gourmet Ice Cream, Dark Skies, and Rafael Lozano-Hemmerʼs 24 Bat-Signals: Opening Night for “Open Air”

Posted September 28th, 2012

Julius Ferraro is a freelance writer in Philadelphia, a former Festival Guide intern, and regular blog contributor. We sent him to cover the opening night of Open Air. This is his story.

Rahzel performs with Mayor Nutter (left) watching the lights at the opening of Open Air. Photo by James Ewing.

My Thursday night started with a closeup view of the moon—craggy, cratered, with the arc of the earthʼs shadow slicing it out of the sky—from the lawn outside the Franklin Institute.

I was in the wrong place.

After the jump: a blacked-out parkway, love for computer glitches, and Rahzel jams.

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Preview: “Open Air”

Posted September 19th, 2012

Open Air kicks off tomorrow night with opening celebrations beginning at 7:30 pm. Then it runs every night through October 14, from 8:00 pm to 11:00 pm. Free!

No Snooze in This News

Posted September 10th, 2012

Spooky spooktacular! Not really. But after the jump, coverage of Fringe in cemeteries, my friend Cherri interviews Jumatatu Poe for KYW, some top picks from our media posse, and more. Rounding up the roundups again, here we go:

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News About Us!

Posted August 27th, 2012

>>>6ABC loves the arts that we do; story featuring El Jefe Nick Stuccio above, and plugs for Sequence 8, Bang, and Le Grand Continental.

>>>The Inquirer plugs Barbie Blended: A Pop Rockin’ Musical, which gets a head start on the 2012 Philly Fringe with early shows this weekend.

>>>The Daily News, Technically Philly, and Newsworks all have Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Open Air on the brain.

>>>Alum news, via Playbill: Elephant Room, which premiered at the 2011 Live Arts Festival, goes Hollywood at the Kirk Douglas Theater.

–Nicholas Gilewicz

Get to Know Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Posted August 15th, 2012

Good morning! To get your day started, take a few minutes and get to know Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, via this awesome Artnet interview.

Open Air runs during the 2012 Live Arts Festival from September 20 through October 14 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. 9:00 to 11:00 pm every night; free!

Open Air is commissioned by the Association for Public Art.

I Literally Cannot Stop Watching Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Videos

Posted August 8th, 2012

Here’s another one, because my eyes are on FIRE.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s installation Open Air runs September 20 through October 14 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Every night, 8:00-11:00 pm. Free!

–Nicholas Gilewicz

Miscellaneous Debris

Posted July 24th, 2012

Live Arts and Philly Fringe artists get around:

>>>James Franco talks Gatz at the Huffington Post. Elevator Repair Service returns to the 2012 Live Arts Festival with Arguendo.

>>>Young Jean Lee’s Church is conquering the eastern seaboard from Maryland to Cape Cod. She also talked to Riff Raff about her first concert, and teaching actors to “rock star” their way through tough tough situations. Her UNTITLED FEMINIST SHOW runs at Live Arts this fall.

>>>Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Open Air gets plugs in the Art Newspaper and Apartment Therapy. And Rafael’s just about everywhere this year. After his installation on the Parkway this fall, Rafael will bring Frequency and Volume, an installment in his Relational Architecture series, to the U.S. for the first time. At SFMOMA.

>>>David Orlansky and Joshua Levin, two teachers laid off by the Philadelphia School District, will send up their past gig at the 2012 Philly Fringe, with Awesome Alliteration: The Magical Musical. For eliminating all literary devices from the schools, they earn a nod as Stars of David. Wait, wasn’t I one of those in a past life?

–Nicholas Gilewicz

Seismoscopic!

Posted July 23rd, 2012

I like Rafael Lorano-Hemmer’s projects; his Open Air will be installed on the Parkway from September 20 through October 14 as part of the 2012 Live Arts Festival. While you wait, watch this video of his project Seismoscope 2: Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali, which explains itself as you go through.

Open Air runs September 20 through October 14 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Center City to Fairmount. 9:00 to 11:00 pm every night, free!

–Nicholas Gilewicz

A Few Questions With Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Creator Of Open Air

Posted May 24th, 2012

Lozano-Hemmer on a rooftop.

One of the biggest surprises of the upcoming Live Arts Festival this September will be one seen by everybody in Philly—not just ticket holders. Every night, from September 20th until October 14th, Open Air, a major visual art installation, will light up the skies, created by a series of high-powered searchlights installed on a half mile stretch of Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Download the right app and call in, and the lights will not only dance to the sound of your voice, but they’ll change their layout so that you, from where you’re standing, will have the best view.

This world premiere project, commissioned by the Association for Public Art (formerly Fairmount Park Art Association), and co-presented by the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival (us!), is designed by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. The Mexican-Canadian bills himself as an electronic artist who develops large-scale interactive installations that are at the intersection of visual art, architecture, and performance art. His work has been featured at all the important places! (Including the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games.) We caught up with him to gain more perspective on this unique installation, and the process of the artist.

All these lights will be looking for you!

Live Arts: Why is the show named Open Air?

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: It is a piece about making the air an open platform for participation, like a free, open space for expression using electronic technologies and powerful lights that take over the sky over Philly, a city with a tradition of free speech.

LA: Why did you choose the various technologies you did for Open Air?

RL: There are three main technologies, all with a military background: searchlights, Internet and GPS.

Searchlights were used in the 19th century to signal the arrival of modernity, to make visible a new energy called electricity. Then they were used at war for anti aircraft surveillance and after the second world war for Victory parades. Now we associate them with corporate shows or the opening of a new mall. I seek to use them to amplify the voice of participants to an urban scale, to use them architecturally to create a visible communication matrix.

The internet likewise has a military history, as it was developed by the Pentagon for distributed communication and control. For Open Air, the network is the means through which people can participate at a distance, and with the advent of the smartphone, they can do so from their own personal device.

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