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Posts Tagged ‘There: In the Light and the Darkness of the Self and of the Other’

2019 Fringe Festival Spotlight: Accessibility

Posted August 15th, 2019

FringeArts is committed to being of Philadelphia, for Philadelphia. As an artistic and cultural institution in this city, we take seriously our responsibility to be accessible to every Philadelphian, at every entryway. From our ticket-buying process to arriving at an event, the performances themselves to our post-show experiences, we are working hard to continuously improve our accessibility and that of our participating Fringe Festival artists and venues.

These performances in the 2019 Fringe Festival are opening up performing arts to a larger audience by offering accessibility. Look out for accessibility icons in the Fringe Festival guide show and on show webpages for more listings. For information on wheelchair accessibility, select the “wheelchair accessible” category (under features) on the shows page.

Cartography
Kanez Schaal and Christopher Myers
Five young people from around the world map their histories, their memories, and their futures. Combining simple storytelling and interactive video technology, this is theater for our times, theater for all ages, theater at its most relevant.
Relaxed Performance on September 15
More information and tickets

Gay Mis
Eric Jaffe
If you like Les Misérables, you’ll LOVE Gay Mis! Join us for a queer, drag queen–infused parody of everyone’s favorite musical! Join Parmesan, Jabear, Fontina, Epanini and the whole gang as they go on a journey through time, space, and cheese. Visit theericjaffe.com for more information.
ASL interpretation on September 8 (at 7pm)
More information and tickets

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‘Us the Children of History’: Blanka Zizka on There

Posted July 23rd, 2019

At first glance, Etel Adnan’s book-length poem There: In the Light and the Darkness of the Self and of the Other, isn’t a natural candidate for adaptation into a play. There are no clearly delineated characters, or dialogue, or plot.

But the Wilma HotHouse Company of actors and its innovative director Blanka Zizka aren’t known for easy, conventional, or boring theater. A diverse group of local actors who meet regularly for artistic training and bonding, HotHouse uses diverse theatrical texts to explore the emotional core of language and relationships.

Etel Adnan’s poem was the very first piece of writing the company read when it began in 2015. As part of the 2019 Fringe Festival, Wilma HotHouse adapts There into an evocative theater piece co-created by Blanka Zizka (Wilma’s artistic director) and visual arts pioneer Rosa Barba. FringeArts’ guide editor Christopher Munden spoke to Blanka in June of 2019 about the meanings and context of this seminal work of contemporary poetry.

Blanka Zizka

Christopher Munden: When did you encounter the poem?

Blanka Zizka: Etel is a close friend of Theodoros Terzopoulos, the director of and Ajax and Antigone [which the Wilma produced in 2013 and 2015, respectively] and he suggested that I read her work. And it was sitting on my desk when I started to work on HotHouse.

One of the reasons for HotHouse was to bring people of different histories and experiences together, and to work as a community, as people who care for each other and create together even though our experiences are very different. So I was thinking that I couldn’t find text that I could work on, because so much of the texts nowadays are written out of identity.

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