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Posts Tagged ‘music’

International Fringe 2018: A Welcome to Artists from Around the World

Posted September 2nd, 2018

The United States government may be pursuing an isolationist policy but the Philadelphia Fringe is doing the opposite: opening its doors not only to the most creative American performers and performances but also to the best and most creative theater artists and their productions from around the world—overcoming the ancient fear of the symbolic Tower of Babel with people not understanding each other.

To show the worldwide scope of the 22nd Philadelphia Fringe Festival, we offer this spotlight on performers from abroad and productions by American artists that present a global perspective.

Theater writer Henrik Eger, editor of Drama Around the Globe and contributor to Phindie and Broad Street Review, among other publications, has lived in six countries on three continents and has visited Africa and Australia as well. He bids everyone a hearty WELCOME to the City of Brotherly Love—this year in 18 different languages: Arabic, Celtic, Chinese, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Irish, Italian, Latin, Polish, Romanian, and Spanish.

We start this year’s overview with a special welcome to two programs featuring a wide range of global creators:

INTERNATIONAL CREATIVES

  1. le super grandBienvenue & welcome to Montreal-based choreographer Sylvain Émard and Le Super Grand ContinentalLe Grand Continental wowed audiences during its run at the 2012 Fringe Festival and has garnered enthusiastic response across the world. Fully realizing a blissful marriage between the pure delight of line dancing and the fluidity and expressiveness of contemporary dance, the celebratory event enlists hundreds of local people to perform its synchronized choreography in large-scale public performances. The world’s most infectious performance event returns to the front steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in an even larger spectacle of dance.

More info and tickets here

  1. Bonvenon, willkommen, bienvenido, witamy, bienvenue & welcome to Do You Want A Cookie? from The Bearded Ladies Cabaret—a world premiere with an international cast. Do You Want A Cookie? serves up a delicious romp through cabaret history, with an international cast of artists performing a live revue of cabaret from the Chat Noir to Weimar nightlife to 21st-century drag. The all-star cast comes draws from around the world, including Bridge Markland (Berlin), Malgorzata Kasprzycka (Paris/Warsaw), Dieter Rita Scholl (Berlin), and Tareke Ortiz (Mexico City).

More info and tickets here

REFUGEES and EXILES

  1. ear whispered

    As Far As My Fingertips Take Me. Photo by

    وسهلا اهلا (ahlaan wasahlan) & bienvenu. Welcome to Tania El Khoury who lives in Lebanon and the UK with her multifaceted program ear-whispered. Little is known about Palestinian refugee camps and their communities. El Khoury presents her Fringe work in five parts through interactive performances and installations at Bryn Mawr College:

    1. Gardens Speak, an interactive sound installation containing the oral histories of ten ordinary people who were buried in Syrian gardens. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.
    2. Camp Pause, a video installation that tells the stories of four residents of the Rashidieh Refugee Camp on the coast of Lebanon. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.
    3. As Far As My Fingertips Take Me, an encounter through a gallery wall between a single audience member and a refugee. (Old City & Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.  
    4. Stories of Refuge, an immersive video installation that invites audiences to lay down on metal bunk beds and watch videos shot by Syrian asylum seekers in Munich, Germany. (Old City.) Read more.
    5. Tell Me What I Can Do, a newly commissioned work featuring letters that audiences have written in response to Gardens Speak. (Bryn Mawr College.) Read more.

More info and tickets here

  1. Bienvenido & welcome to the bilingual (Spanish & English) cast of La Fábrica performing Gustave Ott’s Passport. Lost in a foreign country, Eugenia is detained and thrown into a vicious maelstrom of miscommunication. This poetic and immersive Kafkaesque thriller delves into the question of immigration—exposing the mechanics of language and power. Some performances will be presented in English, some in Spanish, and some will be decided at the toss of a coin.

More info and tickets here

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Shadow House Invites You to Its Kick-Off Party

Posted August 12th, 2016
tamworth cocktail

The evening’s signature cocktail: Tamworth Flora Gin + tonic + squeeze of lime (courtesy of Tamworth Distilling)

On Sunday, August 14th, the Philadelphia Opera Collective and PhilaLandmarks are throwing a kick-off party and fundraiser at the historic Powel House for their fourth original opera, Shadow House. Meet the show’s artistic team, enjoy live music from members of the Philadelphia Opera Collective, and take in the elegance of Powel House and its garden, all while sipping signature cocktails provided by Tamworth Distilling.

Shadow House is part-opera, part-immersive theatrical event staged in Powel House, the result of a partnership between POC and PhilaLandmarks. Conceived by PhilaLandmarks artist-in-residence and POC lead conceptual creator Brenna Geffers, Shadow House weaves together folk pieces, dance rhythms, accordion music, and opera to tell 11 stories spanning 200 years of time. Foregrounded in this work is the rich history of Powel House. “The stories that are humming around a place like the Powel House cry out to be told. So many people pass through the house, living their lives, and leaving little echoes of their existence behind,” says Geffers.  

Shadow House premieres in the Philadelphia Fringe Festival on September 9th. For more upcoming events, check out PhilaLandmarks’ event page.

Shadow House Kick-Off Party
Powel House Garden
244 S 3rd St
6pm-8pm
$20

It Wasn’t Me

Posted June 20th, 2016

FB headers DJ-03

Join us as we reminisce of the past and deny everything she ever caught you doing.
FEATURING:
00s HIPHOP/DANCE/POP
SHAGGY
TRL VIBES
BLEACHED HAIR
PRE-07 MELTDOWN BRITNEY
Our very own “IT WASN’T YOU” CONFESSION BOARD-All night we be accepting confessions and denials for anything you may or may not have been caught doing, JUST SAY IT WASN’TYOU!!!

The Queer Agenda

Posted June 11th, 2016

Queer-Agenda-Post-CardCelebrate Pride Month the best way you know how… by dancing all night long! Saturday, June 11th at 10:30pm FringeArts is hosting a FREE night full of music and dancing with beats from DJ Dame Luz. With his mix of pop, rap, and house featuring queer anthems and artists, you will be begging your friends to cancel the uber ride home!

FREE

Emmanuelle Delpeche Talks Immigrant Life and Spinning Records

Posted June 6th, 2016

“There is a poetry of the exiled that I want to share.” Emmanuelle Delpech

Emmanuelle Delpech is a native of France who has been a longtime performer, teacher, director and deviser of theater in the Philadelphia area. For her newest theatrical creation, Spinning Immigrant, Delpech brings audiences into the lives of immigrants in Philadelphia. Through audio interviews, and set up as DJ Babtoue, she reveals the secrets, regrets, and joys of those who are from somewhere else. We caught up with Delpech to find out more about Spinning Immigrant and her love of deejaying.DSC_1477-1

FringeArts: Why the title Spinning Immigrant?

Emmanuelle Delpeche: Well, I am an immigrant and when I thought about it, I was just starting to get interested in deejaying, aka spinning. Also spinning is a sensation, like my head is spinning, and I definitely have felt like a spinning immigrant in many situations. And I know others have too. So it’s a play on word. It’s kind of the essence of the show. I think as immigrants we always navigate different waters, worlds and it’s complicated. It’s like nausea, you actually might not throw up so will never get the relief. You just don’t feel good. You’re spinning on an endless dilemma.

FringeArts: Tell us about some of the steps from initial inspiration to production?

Emmanuelle Delpeche: I have always been an immigrant, and my identity is rooted in the fact that I am French but more specifically that I am a French woman in the United States and in Philadelphia. I meet easily with other immigrants, and I get along with them often quite quickly. We share an instant intimacy, even if we just met. That’s rarer with Americans. Somehow we are united by the fact that we are foreign, and we therefore feel similar things and have a similar eye on American society. We observe people and their habits. We notice differences because we are different. While I am interesting to Americans, I am French, an actor but other immigrants are invisible. They are unknown, and sometimes people don’t even know where one’s country is on the map. I am tired of that. I want people to have a voice, to be seen and to be understood. There is a poetry of the exiled that I want to share with the American audience. It might tap into their own feelings of exile.DSC_1502

FringeArts: How did you start deejaying?

Emmanuelle Delpeche: Deejaying is a thing I went to because I am an immigrant. I don’t think I would have gone there if I was in France. I am not sure why, but being here gives me the audacity to try new things and deejaying is part of one of these things. It’s also ok for a woman who is 42 to do that, nobody questions me, nobody is judging me, people are rather seduced and encouraging, which isn’t always the case in France.

I want to take a trip into people’s hearts and minds and joys and questions. I want to share that with the audience so they might become visible. I am a body for these voices. I want to be more and more intimate with my own struggle and by interviewing people and spending time with their story, I might understand mine better. I also want to make visible intimacy and how that is actually what matters. And when you are not “home,” it is quite hard to find. You seek it, you look for the familiar, the known. I have been here for a long time but it took me very very long to feel safe and at ease. To feel at home again.

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Big Voices: Suite n˚2, Saul Williams

Posted September 15th, 2015

encyclop--diedelaparolecbeaborgers_small-1024x683Since working here, one way I’ve come to think about the Fringe Festival is as an assembly of voices, juxtaposed and recombining in different ways to different ends for each of us who goes to the shows. And tonight, we have some strong voices coming through the Festival.

First, Suite n˚2 opens tonight at 7:00 pm at Christ Church Neighborhood House for shows tonight and tomorrow. Found words juxtaposed as choral, it’s among the more innovative compositions that FringeArts has brought through.

Then late night: freaking SAUL WILLIAMS with Nguyen Smith, and then King Britt spins until closing time. Starts at 9 pm. See you at both? Yes, I will.

Center City Fringe: Get into the GROOVE!

Posted August 17th, 2015

Philadelphia Fringe Festival favorite Tongue & Groove, Philly’s cutting-edge critically-acclaimed unscripted theater company, announces a first-time collaboration with blues dancers and musicians for a unique improvised performance based on personal information from the audience. Founded in 2006, Tongue & Groove has created nine unscripted show formats, including their popular SECRETS, in which the actors are inspired by the audience’s true secrets. Tongue & Groove has been invited to perform at the Kimmel Center for both Philadelphia International Festivals of the Arts. For PIFA 2013, Tongue & Groove collaborated with dance company RealLivePeople and developed THAT TIME. That collaboration was so successful that Tongue & Groove Artistic Director, Bobbi Block, was eager to find another project in which improvisational dance and music could share the stage with the actors. That desire is being realized with GROOVE

GROOVE_Tongue-Groove-Spontaneous-Theater-300x214

FringeArts: What can audiences expect when they come out for a performance of GROOVE?

Bobbi Block: When the audience arrives, they will be asked to anonymously write on a card their response to this prompt: “Describe a specific time when you were in the groove…with yourself, a partner, a group, or something you were doing.” The ensemble will draw random cards, read them aloud, and begin riffing off of the themes and characters submitted. Tongue & Groove is dedicated to exploring the collaboration between artist and patron, reflecting the spirit of each audience at every one-of-a-kind performance.

FringeArts: How do you use music and dance in the show?

Bobbi Block: GROOVE will follow Tongue & Groove’s signature format, creating a montage of scenes and monologues, both comic and dramatic. Interspersed in the montage will be blues dances that comment on and interpret the themes and characters created by the actors, inspired by the audience.

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Disabled like a titanium lollipop: Musician, Model, and Medical Experiment at the 2015 Fringe

Posted July 29th, 2015

1683-e37a8444bc2810407a1fd83fba3b1b8a“Anomie was born at age twenty on an operating table. Surgical experiments saved her life but left her disabled like a titanium lollipop.”

Anomie is a musician. Outside of creating music, she models for “Sick and Sexy,” her self-created group for alternative models with disabilities. Anomie has undergone several surgeries.  She is an artist who has Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a genetic defect in connective tissue, which impacts joints, skin, and muscles. After a series of medical issues in 2008, she was forced to discard her life as a biochemistry college student in exchange for a new identity. The physical complications that occurred as a result of EDS have not only left her physically disabled, but have also stranded her on the outskirts of society. “My bones are titanium from the neck up, and I’ve been an electric wheelchair user for almost three years now.  I refer to it as ‘my mecha-body,’ although I would prefer a robotic exoskeleton because sitting still for long periods of time really sucks,” Anomie says.

Anomie is taking her music and story to the 2015 Fringe Festival in a show, called Musician, Model & Medical Experiement. During her performance, which takes place at Agno Grill on September 6, 10, and 16, Anomie shares her story and reclaims her identity through song and burlesque. “The songs are about all sorts of things, evil doctors, bad boyfriends, bad girlfriends, vampires, and living in public housing in the projects. I will be doing at least one burlesque act per show. Because of my restricted mobility I cannot dance for burlesque, so I sing and use props instead,” she says. Her songs consist of guitar and digital back tracks. Some of her pieces are collaborative works, while others are solo creations. While Anomie’s music captures her own story, she references the larger disabled community. “I’d like to tell a story more than just singing and performing. The story is my personal experience, but the show is as much about me as it is about all of those who go through these challenges.”

Greatnecklogo-257x300Anomie refers to her community as “the underworld.” She uses this term because disabled people are locked out of society, prevented from participating in mainstream culture, by those in power who fail to include people with chronic medical conditions. Her songs make visible a group of people society tends to ignore. “I refer to ‘crip’ society as ‘the underworld’ a lot because of the way we have to live with chronic medical conditions. I am unable to work a standard job, live an average full life, get married, have a family, and feel like a part of regular society. This is not because of I have Ehlers Danlos Syndrome really. This is mostly because the system we live in does not allow disabled people to do that,” she says. Our city is inaccessible. The larger structure of our society allows disabled people to be disregarded. When the disabled community is not swept underneath the societal rug, they are noticed specifically for their difference through events that highlight their disability, like Special Olympics and non-profit fundraisers. Anomie is either erased from society or put underneath a microscope like a unrecognizable object. “I’ve had done experimental treatments for the neurological problems associated with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Arnold Chiari Malformation and Tethered Spinal Cord.  My cranio-cervical fusion surgery was recorded and used for teaching purposes at the Harvey Cushing Institute of Neuroscience.

When asked if she had a fetish, Anomie responded “No, but there are fetishes for people like me.”  She explained one called ‘devotee’ in which a person sexualizes care-taking of a disabled person. The other she explained was called ‘Agalmatophilia’ which is the fetishization of a statue, or in her case a person who is fixed solid with fusion implants.

1683-ab13436c70b238738d5e76d763fbad1c“Disability is the ultimate counterculture.” After struggling to participate in society, Anomie realized that she would always be excluded. Instead of trying to return to college for the third time, she is developing an identity that works for her. As she sings, she claims agency and strength, despite living in a world that denies her power. “I picked the name Anomie for myself, because that’s exactly what the word means: disconnected, rebel. But I’m not disconnected really, there’s a whole community of people living in this ‘underworld’ finding ways to make what we’re given with work.”

Musician, Model & Medical Experiment
Agno Grill
2104 Chestnut Street
Sept 6 at 3pm
Sept 10 at 9pm
Sept 16 at 9pm
Click for tickets

–Courtney Lau

Tonight! Maya Beiser’s “Uncovered” at the FringeArts Stage

Posted September 7th, 2014

You’ve probably gotten wind of how awesome our late night programming is, but in case you haven’t, check it out for yourself tonight at 9:00 pm. Cellist Maya Beiser covers iconic rock songs, from “Lithium” to “Kashmir.” Preview below:

Maya Beiser’s “Uncovered
Tonight, 9:00 pm
FringeArts Stage
140 N. Columbus Blvd.
Free!

Sacred Spaces and the Arts: A Chat with Rich Kirk from the Calvary Center

Posted September 17th, 2012

Prarthana Jayaram is a Philly-based writer and regular Festival Blog contributor. She talked to Rich Kirk, the chairman of the board for the Cavalry United Methodist Church. The West Philly church, located at 48th Street and Baltimore Avenue, hosts the Cavalry Center for Culture and Community, which in turn hosts Curio Theatre Company and Crossroads Music. Crossroads produced two shows for this year’s Philly Fringe: The Legend of Nahia: A Healing Story, which closed Saturday, and a concert this Wednesday, September 19 with Sao Paolo Underground (which features killer trumpeter and Chicago-by-way-of-Sao Paolo scenester Rob Mazurek). After the jump: Rich Kirk on Cavalry, and video from Sao Paolo Underground.

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The Beat on Brat

Posted September 14th, 2012

Madi, in situ

“I lost the best actress award to Lynn Redgrave, which is awesome!” says Madi Distefano, of her 2004 Barrymore Award nomination for Popsicle’s Departure, 1989. That show was also nominated for outstanding new play at that year’s Barrymores, but got even greater plaudits when it moved to the Edinburgh Fringe: best solo show.

Madi, the founder and artistic director of Brat Productions, described her one-woman show better than I ever could, when we spoke last week: ” Popsicle Departure 1989 is a tall tale shaggy dog monologue about a 19-year-old punk rock chick who lives in a warehouse and has a lame temp job and a crystal meth problem. Her boyfriend is a slacker guitarist South Boston boy. It goes back and forth between the two of them and they’re headed towards collision; she’s planning something, he’s planning something else, and a train wreck kind of thing ensues.”

“It’s beautiful,” says Jess Conda, who’s stage-managed numerous productions of the show. “I’ve done that show with Madi at least five or six times—all the Philly mounts, a run in New York City, the run in Edinburgh that won all the awards, and a run with her in Glascow. I probably have it memorized too.”

Jess, who is now the assistant artistic director of Brat, will be a bit distracted from Madi’s remount of Popsicle at this year’s Philly Fringe. Paired with Popsicle is Jess’s first original show, Eternal Glamnation, and together, they are known as Brat RockPile. Previews done, they take the stage in full RAWK mode tomorrow, and for he rest of Philly Fringe. Be forewarned: the RockPile description reads, “CAUTION: THESE SHOWS FEATURE SEX, DRUGS, FLESH, STROBE LIGHTS, LOUD ROCK, PROFANITY, AND ALIEN ABDUCTIONS.” And so it goes in the Eraserhood.

After the jump: two brats are better than one. And GWAR!!!

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Crossing Boundaries

Posted September 14th, 2012

Prarthana Jayaram is a Philly-based writer and regular Festival Blog contributor.

“Limitations in our minds are connected to those in our bodies,” says Michal Waldfogel, a Philadelphia native and local musician.

These self-imposed limitations are the subject of her new Fringe show, Crossing Imaginary Lines, in which she combines yogic practices with music to engage audiences. With eight years of yoga experience under her belt (three of which she has spent teaching), Michal is excited to combine her work in understanding and stretching physical limitations with the theme of overcoming boundaries in her compositions. She observes that both yoga and music are healing arts, and it is this inherent connection that she works to bring out in her performances.

“So much of my philosophy around education is about empowerment. I want to teach people to imagine new possibilities from their limitations,” she says.

After the jump: travel, boundaries, and yogic touring.

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Ricky Lake Jackson Needs to Get Back Home

Posted September 9th, 2012

It’s pronounced “uh-MAIR-kuh.”

Most of my exposure to so-called Southern Rock has been through either the biker part of my family (no joke, despite, or is it because of? my family origins in northwest Pennsylvania), Midwestern friends who played such things during drunken nights in college in a nostalgia for a time that never was and that they could never have experienced, and in a cover of “Sweet Home Alabama” played by two bands at my college who joined forces for an epic encore in a dining hall.

So, when I went to meet Ricky Lake Jackson of Jawbone Junction, five-month-old baby in tow, I was ready to hang. Stuck in Philadelphia after the death of their lead guitarist, they’re doing a three-night stand at the Twisted Tail during Philly Fringe, to try to get some scratch to get back home to Arkansas.

After the jump: How Ricky Lake got his name, the death of Slim Willie Jefferson, and face-melting.

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Late Night Fringe-ing: Where The Wild Things Are

Posted September 7th, 2012

Wolf-suited Max, from Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, is sent to his bedroom for mischievous behavior; little does his mother know that the real mischief begins at a boy’s exile post. As the moon rises outside his window, so does Max’s threshold for indoor foliage: his nightstand becomes a bush, and trees grow in place of his bedposts. Soon, an ocean sluices through the door and he rides away on a boat towards the forest where the wild things are: those bird-boar-Hagrid monstrosities depicted by Sendak.

In this year’s Philly Fringe (which, if you haven’t been living in Max’s world, should know opens tonight), there are more than a handful of shows that take place in the bewitching hour where today, tomorrow and yesterday all squat; it’s the hour where anything can–and if you’re Fringe-ing–will happen. I spoke with Jake Blouch of Jawbone Junction: Live at the Twisted Tail and Rebecca Wright of Applied Mechanic’s Some Other Mettle about what it means to perform in the time-space where the wild things lurk.

But before you jump: listen to Christopher Walken read (and improv his own lines) from Where the Wild Things Are.

 

After the jump: Skynyrd, and a performance that takes place at the Earth’s core.

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This Is a Photo of Ricky Lake Jackson Flirting with My Daughter

Posted August 23rd, 2012

Much as I like this job, once in a while, it has a creepy pitfalls. Luckily, Ricky Lake is not Wee Zee’s type. Ricky Lake is stranded here in Philly with his band Jawbone Junction, and you can help send him back whence he came at the 2012 Philly Fringe.

Jawbone Junction: Live at the Twisted Tail runs September 9, 16, and 23 at the Twisted Tail, 509 S. 2nd Street, Society Hill. Two shows each night, 10:00 pm and midnight; $10.

–Nicholas Gilewicz

Philly Fringe Vital Stats: David Orlansky, Joshua Levin, and Zachary Kind (BetaMale Productions)

Posted August 20th, 2012

Betamales in their natural posture: the eager high five.

A betamale is an underdog of sorts. At least when it comes to women (or men): seducing them, dating them, and avoiding being rejected by them are all difficult tasks for the betamale to master, or manage to do one time. Luckily, a betamale has the arts (and computer science), and this is a field in which he can excel. At this year’s Philly Fringe, BetaMale Productions–composed of three, self-identified betamales–gives us their musical Awesome Alliteration: The Magical Musical. It’s the stuff of betamale dreams: nerdin’ out on literary devices in front of attractive and willing onlookers (in the case of very few most Philadelphia audiences). David, Joshua, and Zachary of BetaMale Productions answered our questions, and got sexist on us after the jump.

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Jawbone Junction Needs Your Help!

Posted August 16th, 2012

Jawbone Junction definitely, definitely needs help.

Jawbone Junction: Live at the Twisted Tail runs September 9, 16, and 23 at the Twisted Tail, 509 S. 2nd Street, Society Hill.

–Nicholas Gilewicz

Call Me Crazy Dancers’ John Curtis On Music, Tap Dance, And Being Married To Your Co-Director

Posted August 15th, 2012

Director John Curtis and dancer Brittany Dunn tap it out.

“The creative process for our show begins with the music,” wrote singer, dancer, choreographer, and NYC resident John Curtis, when we exchanged e-mails this past week. John is co-directing Call Me Crazy Dancers’ 2012 Philly Fringe submit Day for a Dream; a version of the show (titled Daydreams) is coming off a run at the Capital Fringe, where the group garnered a nod from DC Metro Theater Arts. Joined by dancer Amy Smith and co-director Kara Curtis, John leads both the Call Me Crazy band and an eponymous company of dancers.

After the jump: John talks about involving student dancers in his work, and what it’s like to crush on your co-director.

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Umer Piracha, Straddling Pakistan and Philadelphia

Posted August 14th, 2012

Prarthana Jayaram is a Philly-based writer and regular Festival Blog contributor.

“The way people connect with art and music is the same everywhere,” West Philly musician Umer Piracha observes.

Umer’s music is concerned with the nature of things: “It’s about accepting the world as it is and being on a journey of exploration,” he says. Part of his exploration involves recognizing and investigating the connectedness of all things; a sense of universality and a drive to embody that feeling of connection permeate his music. Umer’s vision of art as a universalizing force will fuel his forthcoming debut album, a multilingual blend of Pakistani-folk-inspired songs alongside more traditionally Western tracks.

Migrating to Pennsylvania from a small town in Pakistan, Umer never expected his life path to take a turn toward the arts. But when he arrived at Franklin & Marshall College nine years ago, he began to view his interest in music with fresh eyes.

After the jump: Umer blossoms in Lancaster.

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Weekender: What You’re Doing And Why

Posted August 3rd, 2012

The holy writ has been revealed by the proverbial prophets, angels, and nagas! That is, the 2012 Philadelphia Live Arts Festival + Philly Fringe Guide is out ‘n about: TONIGHT, grab a guide inside the Arden Theatre Company (40 North 2nd Street) from 5pm to  8pm. COME AND GET IT (re: Badfinger below). You can enjoy First Friday celebrations in the Old City while perusing the guide, and making exclamatory snap judgements: “I have to see this one!” “Awful. It sounds like an NBC pilot that was never picked up.” Because, if you follow Malcolm Gladwell’s creed, you know that first impressions are worth investing in.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk57K4OGrAg&w=420&h=315]

If you don’t pick up a guide tonight head for the nearest coffee shop; more likely than not, they’re packin’. Then continue to mark up your guide–I’m a disciple of the practice of circling and crossing-out–while attending these weekend events:

>>>Friday: Pick up your 2012 Live Arts + Philly Fringe Guide. You have one mission; do not fail.

>>>Saturday: Check out the Mad Decent Block Party from noon to 9pm at Penns Landing. If you’ve found inspiration in Olympians’ endurance, forestall the retreat to the couch and see California hip-hop artist Aesop Rock w/ Rob Sonic and DJ Big Wiz at Union Transfer. Doors open at 8pm.

>>>Sunday: If you’re in the Northern Liberties section, make your way over to the 2nd Street Festival. It starts at noon. There will be beer gardens AND a moon bounce–potentially, a nauseating combo. Or head in the direction of ‘burbia, and check out the Norristown Dance Festival. Performing companies hail from Boston, NYC, and Italy; bellissimo!

–Audrey McGlinchy